QUEEN SURVIVOR: Results - Innuendo wins!

Are you satisfied with the results?


  • Total voters
    5

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
Thanks Cornfed. Even Perun voted for it. People, let's get to our senses. ;)
Posted a year ago:
A Night at the Odeon – Hammersmith 1975 is a live album by English rock band Queen. The album is the first official release of the band's Christmas Eve performance at the Hammersmith Odeon in 1975. It was released on 20 November 2015 in CD, DVD, SD Blu-ray and double vinyl formats, as well as a deluxe box set including a hardback book and reproductions of period-specific tour memorabilia. The DVD/Blu-ray release also features bonus material from Queen's first tour of Japan in 1975, and a 22-minute documentary featuring interviews from Brian May, Roger Taylor and Bob Harris entitled 'Looking Back at the Odeon'.
Barbarian camerawork. Not a single shot from May during that solo. But it sounds so good! :notworthy:
Freddie rules on that piano!

  1. Liar
  2. Father To Son
  3. Ogre Battle
  4. The Fairy Feller's Master-Stroke
  5. Nevermore
  6. Lily Of the Valley
  7. Now I'm Here
  8. In the Lap of the Gods
  9. Dear Friends
  10. Bring Back That Leroy Brown
  11. In the Lap of the Gods... Revisted
 
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Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
Sheer Heart Attack has a ton of filler on the second side but the best moments give us our first glimpse of Queen's greatness. I prefer it as a whole to the debut, not quite as strong as Queen II although there are several songs better than anything on II.

Brian May's guitar playing is the highlight of Brighton Rock, the noodling section toward the end is a bit drawn out but there's some cool stuff there. A good example of them breaking up the typical rock format a bit. This song is a bit of a mess but it has a lot of cool moments.

Killer Queen is awesome. One of the hits that I haven't gotten tired of. They nailed the vaudeville thing on this song. The best part is the backing vocals though. Also a ton of excellent guitar licks. Probably the most well constructed song we've heard from Queen so far. The outro is awesome.

The Tenement Funster/Flick Of the Wrist/Lily Of the Valley sequence is the highlight of the album for me. Each song works just fine on its own, but the three songs fit together perfectly. Tenement Funster gradually grows in intensity before peaking with Flick Of the Wrist which then brings it back down in time for Lily Of the Valley. If we were to promote three songs right now, these would be my choices.

Now I'm Here is a solid rock tune that would probably be a highlight on the first album. But on this album I favor the more ambitious songs.

In the Lap of Gods is pretty cool. Both songs have their own unique qualities and are worth keeping around awhile.

Stone Cold Crazy is a heavy Queen song that I really like. The riff is awesome and the vocal parts have a 50s swagger to them. It's a bizarre combination but they make it work.

What follows is a long string of half baked songs. I like Leroy Brown for its quirkiness but the other songs feel like they ran out of studio time to properly finish.
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
I am curious to meet another Queen album with such an excellent ride of first four songs.
Pretty sure I've replayed that youtube video 15 times.
Won't be voting for that song for a while.
Well, I admit the studio version is less impressive. Different even. It doesn't have that whole solo + piano section.
 
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desultory

1-2-3-compassion
As someone who is a big fan of Queen II, I disagree with you, but understand what you mean. Queen II is a fascinating document of a band that is still finding itself. When the debut came out, the band was dissatisfied, because it had taken almost a year from recording to release, and they had significantly evolved since then. Hence, they did not feel it properly represented them and their style anymore. Like many debuts, it was a collection of songs that had been developed and refined over several years, tried and tested live, and thus the album seems comparatively tight and structured. Queen II is a mess. But that, I think, is what is so great about it. You can hear so many brilliant ideas that are not yet dealt with in the disciplined manner of a professional recording artist. On the one hand, it makes you wonder what would have happened had they decided to further explore a certain set of ideas or continued on this or that avenue. On the other hand, you can hear masterpieces in the making. What is March of the Black Queen if not an embryonic version of Bohemian Rhapsody? This song deserves much more attention as a document of the development of musical ideas. Freddie reportedly had been working on Bohemian Rhapsody since the late sixties, and I think this is the first time he tried to shape his ideas into a coherent song. It is certainly not as coherent, refined and composed as Bohemian Rhapsody, but it's a remarkable glimpse into the mind of a genius nevertheless.

I think your remark about the Brian and Freddie sides is true to a certain extent. It presents both songwriters as distinct individuals, and it probably does help to appreciate their later combined efforts, although both remained prolific songwriters of their own. Many of Queen's most enduring classics were written by only one of the two (or neither). Again, this presentation of the album allows for a unique glimpse into the development of the band. I guess it boils down to whether this is what you want to appreciate in a song or an album or not. Generally speaking, I probably wouldn't care enough for it. But in the case of Queen, investigating and exploring the individual threads is just as fascinating as admiring the whole tapestry. I think this is why Queen II is so popular and admired among fans.
Awesome to re-visit the album and read something like this. Good stuff. It's a hit and miss album for me, but I see some of your points. I will have to relisten again.
 

Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
Eliminated
My Fairy King
Nevermore
Dear Friends
Bring Back Leroy Brown
She Makes Me

Promoted
Keep Yourself Alive
Great King Rat
Liar
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
  1. Father To Son
  2. Ogre Battle
  3. The Fairy Feller's Master-Stroke
  4. Lily Of the Valley
  5. Now I'm Here
  6. In the Lap of the Gods
  7. Misfire
  8. In the Lap of the Gods... Revisted
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
If you don't mind (discussion can also be good before voting I think), I'm curious for opinions on the next album, A Night at the Opera (1975). Did some of you already go for it? I've heard it twice now but I feel I like it less than Sheer Heart Attack. Clear favourites are The Prophet's Song and Bohemian Rhapsody and I also like Death on Two Legs. That's 3 songs. But the rest? Hmm. Not my thing to be honest. What about you guys?
 

desultory

1-2-3-compassion
Not my cup of tea either. I like the songs you mentioned - plus You're My Best Friend.
The rest, or many of them, are mostly mildly interesting, or sometimes, even verging on annoying.
I prefer Sheer Heart Attack.
 

mckindog

Living for Sanctuary from the law
Staff member
It's funny, but I would have been with you guys 100 % a week ago, but I've really enjoyed it's eclectic nature on this relisten. Where has 39 been all my life?
 

mckindog

Living for Sanctuary from the law
Staff member
Late take on the songs of II:

* Procession shows of that signature May guitar sound, but its more about the studio trickery than the music. Priest does it better on Prelude
* The middle part of Father to the Son is really quite heavy and aggressive but it isn't produced that way. The rest of it is fine, kind of stately, but it doesn't let loose enough for me until the last minute, which is pleasantly anthemic.
* The melodies of White Queen are fantastic — beautiful, ethereal stuff — but I find I trifle sterile on record. That live, version though :bigsurprise: — those piano runs, that solo, and Mercury is fantastic.
* Some Day, One Day is a pleasant, inoffensive hippy ballad. Meh.
* That's a surprisingly modern drum sound on Loser in the End and the track has a groovy shuffle and a gritty feel that's not typical for Queen or this album.

* The cacophony that opens Ogre Battle is fabulous. Great heavy guitar riffing and pounding drums, lots of changes. Good noisy song. (Drives my wife crazy :p)
* Fairy Feller isn't as heavy as Ogre Battle, but it is even more challenging. Again lots of great change-ups, rhythmically and melodically
* Nevermore is more of interlude than a song, or a denouement to the Ogres and Fairies before the suite bridges into Black Queen.
* Black Queen is more of that dense, cacophonic prog. The layering is impressive. Challenging, epic stuff.
* I like Funny How Love Is better as a closer to the suite than as a standalone song. It's a hippy rock opera anthem.
* It's funny how easy on the ears Seven Seas is after working your way through the suite. It's not simple, but it is catchy and groovy.
 

Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
Eliminated
Father To Son
Fairy Feller
In the Lap of the Gods
Misfire
In the Lap of the Gods Revisited

A Night At the Opera joins the battle!
 

Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
White Queen has grown on me significantly this game (the whole Queen II album in general but this song specifically). I would now like to see it promoted, although that's mostly out of necessity since Father To Son is no longer in the conversation. Anyway, it's a really cool song. Anybody else reminded of Jealousy from the Jazz album when listening to it?

Also what is the big deal with Now I'm Here? I find it to be among the weaker songs on that album yet it seems like an early favorite.
 

Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
Probably a cliche, but A Night At the Opera is my favorite Queen album. Even without Bohemian Rhapsody it is a masterpiece. Every song is at least very good and several are among the band's best. It is also the first album where it feels like the whole band is operating at full force. The early albums are very much dominated by Brian May and Freddie Mercuy. While they are still at the forefront here, there is more room for the other two members.

Death On Two Legs - The angriest Queen song? Such a good opener. It's heavy but also melodic, the studio trickery really enhances it too. The vocal harmonies are operating at full force here.

One of the major strengths with this album is that it is the first Queen album that showcases them both as a band and as individuals. Death On Two Legs is followed by four tunes that showcase each member. I love how Lazing On a Sunday Afternoon completely contrasts the previous song. You know right away that you're in for an eclectic set of music. I love Freddie's vaudevillian side. I'm In Love With My Car is just a great simple rock tune. You're My Best Friend is John Deacon's first masterpiece. It is a sappy sweet pop tune, but it is so masterfully composed. Each part seamlessly blends into the next and the keyboard hook is irresistible. Really cool vocal harmonies too. The big guitar harmonies at the end are the icing on the cake. '39 might be my favorite Brian May song. Great folk tune with a sci-fi twist. I love the middle section with the insane harmonies. It's like the soundtrack to a time machine. This sequence of five songs is one of the all time greatest. Could very well be Queen at their absolute peak. But we haven't even gotten to Bohemian Rhapsody yet.

One interesting musical quality about Queen is how often they utilize 3/4 time. It gives songs like Sweet Lady a more danceable quality. There's an element of elegance there that most Rock music doesn't have. In the hands of other musicians, this would probably be far more aggressive and lack that swing. This is probably my least favorite song on the album, but I've come to appreciate it more recently.

Seaside Rendezvous deserves to stay in the game a few rounds solely for the incredible "horn section" in the middle. But it's a good song aside from that too. More Freddie Mercury vaudevillian goodness.

I suppose Prophet's Song is probably the favorite around here. This is one I don't really "get", even though it's a solid song. The a capella section is incredible, but I find the main theme is a little too repetitive. Again, I like the song, just don't think it's among the best on this album.

Love of My Life is an incredible track. It's a ballad but Freddie writes ballads in a way that nobody else can. There's a classical quality to the melody and the piano work. Also augmented by John Decon's bass playing and the cello/violin like guitar embellishments.

Good Company has become a sort of forgotten track for me, being sandwiched between two masterpieces. Musically it's like a mixture of Seaside Rendezvous and '39. I love the guitar work on this. It's a very convincing horn section. Another song that shows Queen as masters of the studio.

Not even going to bother to comment on Bohemian Rhapsody. It has all been said. And still, despite being widely regarded as the greatest rock song of all time, I don't think it is anywhere near overrated.
 

Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
Going to start leaving new albums open two extra days, starting with this one.
 

Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
Eliminated
Sweet Lady
Seaside Rendezvous
Good Company
God Save the Queen
 

Mosh

And I should contemplate this change
Staff member
Looks like this one had less voters, though I'm not keeping track of everyone who voted. So I'll leave this open an extra day.
 

mckindog

Living for Sanctuary from the law
Staff member
Way behind here. Not sure if Sheer Heart Attack is my favourite collection of songs on a Queen album, but sonically it is most in my wheelhouse: smart, interesting melodic hard rock with metal edges.
  • The initial verse vocals on Brighton Rock are mite bit twee for me and the guitar histrionics a trifle over the top. But those are minor quibbles. It's interesting and relatively heavy with some tasty playing and a good chorus
  • It's hard to imagine a better rock single than Killer Queen, with those delightful pop melodies and harmonies, rhythmic twists and that killer solo. So much packed into such a brief, catchy song.
  • The suite is excellent: Tenement Funster has a nice smokey build and an understated toughness, Flick of the Wrist is again a trifle understated, but with a nasty black heart and some great twists and vintage Queen accents, Lily is elegant and stylish and doesn't overstay its welcome — a nice brief close.
  • The band reveals its ability to do simple well probably for the first time with Now I'm Here. A great fun rock song showcasing those vintage Queen harmonies and May's great rhythm guitar sound.
  • I don't dislike Lap of the Gods, but it is a little too pompous and flamboyant for my tastes, which usually enjoy pompous and flamboyant
  • Stone Cold Crazy is the most ass-kicking metal song they ever did. Great riff, great energy, fun vocal
  • Queen has a lot of songs like Dear Friends that can be hit or miss for me. Brief as it is, this one's a miss.
  • Misfire is pleasant and unremarkable and mostly underrated. It's better than just a filler track.
  • It's never going to stick around for me in a survivor, but I find Leroy Brown a lot of fun.
  • She Makes Me is meh — kinda ponderous and mopey.
  • Revisited has a decent drunken wake chorus but I really have to be in a certain mood to stay with it.
 

mckindog

Living for Sanctuary from the law
Staff member
A Night at the Opera is amazing — truly one of the great, ambitious rock albums ever. But it is so eclectic it must be hard to find many who love it from start to finish.
  • Death on Two Legs might be top 10 for me. Moving forward Queen tended to fragment into songs that were genre-specific. This is one of those tracks that brings all those elements together in something quintessentially Queen — pointed, perfectly produced, lush vocals, guitar bite and it rocks. Outstanding stuff.
  • It is vintage Mercury to follow up a nasty piece of business like Death with a fluffy, tongue-in-cheek romp like Lazing On a Sunday Afternoon. It is the perfect length. Any more and it would have been too much, but as it is, it is a perfect bridge between a pair of rockers.
  • Roger Taylor's I'm Love With My Car is an excellent, throbbing slow burn of a hard rock track. I like the gritty vocal and the creative guitar.
  • I'm not sure if there is a more irresistible pop song than Deacon's Your My Best Friend. What a great easy groove, that organ riff, the nuanced vocal, the drum fills, the melodic solo. Everything works.
  • '39 is a perfect folk ballad. Nice tale, nicely told, with a great fireside chorus. I like it more now than I ever have.
  • I wouldn't call Sweet Lady a misstep. It's OK, it's just a pretty generic '70s rock song on an album that has very little generic material
  • I shouldn't like Seaside Rendezvous, but it is a delicious bit of campy fun.
  • The Prophet Song is unfairly unnoticed by mainstream audiences and not quite the masterpiece some Queen fans make it out to be. I find the midsection amazing but it overstays its welcome a bit. The song is, however, an excellent, ambitious epic.
  • I don't like Love of my Life as much as some do, but it is gorgeous.
  • I agree with what Mosh said about Good Company. I respect it more than I like it, but I do like it.
  • Bohemian Rhapsody deserves all the acclaim it has received.
 
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