Language topic

Freeyyaa

mordebo et stringebo
I wonder if a purebred Englishman can study a foreign language, even Teutonic one, or the structure of his native language prevents him from it.
 

Perun

And the world, unheeding, turns
Staff member
Native speakers, can the term "beast of burden" be used in contemporary English in a literal sense, i.e. referring to a mule or an ox, or is it too archaic?
 

Black Bart

Ancient Mariner
Native speakers, can the term "beast of burden" be used in contemporary English in a literal sense, i.e. referring to a mule or an ox, or is it too archaic?
Neither Collins nor Merriam-Webster lists this phrase as 'archaic'.
 

Brigantium

Grim Reaper
Staff member
It's a bit flowery, tends to get associated with biblical stuff, rightly or wrongly. If you're going for a literary style, though, it's okay. It probably wouldn't work in very 'straight' writing like a sociology essay.
 

LooseCannon

Yorktown-class aircraft carrier
Staff member
I'd use it, especially if making a metaphor, "He was worked like a beast of burden". If I was referring to actual horses and such, I might avoid the term.
 

Ariana

Black-and-white leopard
I have an oddly specific question for all Scandinavian speakers. @Dr. Eddies Wingman @SixesAlltheway and anyone else, including @LooseCannon 's girlfriend.

In many European languages, we use similar words for slippers: Pantoffel (German), pantoufle (French), pantofla (Greek), pantofi (Bulgarian), pantofola (Italian), etc. However, it seems that all Nordic languages have dropped the first syllable - toffel (Swedish), tøffel (Danish and Norwegian), tohveli (Finnish). So my question is WHY? It can't be simply because it's shorter, that would be extremely disappointing. WHY?
 
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Ariana

Black-and-white leopard
:( So it's just economy of language. I was hoping for a more intriguing reason why you dropped the pan-. Thanks though!
 

The Flash

Dennis Wilcock did 9/11
They're called "terlik" here, which means sweater.

Sweater, as in pullover, is "kazak" or "süveter" btw.
 
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