Food from your country

Farhang

Invader
Perun said:
I had a Kabab-e Bakhtiyari the other day. Heartbreakingly delicious.


So, typical German foods nowadays would be döner kebab, spaghetti and currywurst. Damn, I haven't had a currywurst in ages...

I though Doner Kebab was a Turkish food...????
 

Dr. Eddies Wingman

Brighter than thousand_suns
Look at the number of Turks in Germany ... especially in Berlin, where Perun's from  :D

A friend of mine stayed at a university in Berlin for some months a couple of years back.In one particularly Turkisih-dominated part of the city, he saw a sign outside a store which said "WIR SPRECHEN AUCH DEUTSCH" (We speak German too - meaning not just Turkish)
 

Perun

Περούν Παντοκράτωρ
Staff member
Farhang said:
I though Doner Kebab was a Turkish food...????

It is. But Turks are the largest ethnic minority in Germany, and döner kebabs have become the country's favourite fast food.

Eddies Wingman said:
A friend of mine stayed at a university in Berlin for some months a couple of years back.In one particularly Turkisih-dominated part of the city, he saw a sign outside a store which said "WIR SPRECHEN AUCH DEUTSCH" (We speak German too - meaning not just Turkish)

That sounds like the part of the city I currently live in. It's also known as "Little Istanbul", and even local supermarkets have signs in Turkish.
 

Mega

Ancient Mariner
Perun said:
I had a Kabab-e Bakhtiyari the other day. Heartbreakingly delicious.


So, typical German foods nowadays would be döner kebab, spaghetti and currywurst. Damn, I haven't had a currywurst in ages...

Where be my frankfurter at  ;)
 

Dr. Eddies Wingman

Brighter than thousand_suns
Perun said:
That sounds like the part of the city I currently live in. It's also known as "Little Istanbul", and even local supermarkets have signs in Turkish.

A part of Oslo is called "Little Karachi" due to it being dominated by people of Pakistani descent ...
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
Lots of stuff

Let me just do a few famous ones:

220px-Hollandse_Nieuwe_001.JPG

Hollandse Nieuwe, "new" raw herring

220px-Gerookte_paling.jpeg

Gerookte paling, smoked eel

220px-Frikandel.jpg

A frikandel with french fries

220px-Chocoladeletter_A.jpg

A chocolate letter, a typical Dutch candy, a Sinterklaas present given to children, the first letter of the child's name made out of chocolate, supposedly thrown down the chimney by a Zwarte Piet or Sinterklaas himself

220px-Dutch_apple_pie_Sub_Rosa_Chiang_Mai.jpg

Appeltaart, Dutch apple pie

220px-Oliebollen.jpg

Oliebollen, a Dutch pastry eaten on New Year's Eve

275px-Gaufre_biscuit.jpg

Stroopwafels

I forgot to mention another famous one: Stamppot!

Stamppot (eng. "mash pot") is a traditional Dutch dish made from a combination of potatoes mashed with one or several other vegetables, sometimes also with bacon. These vegetable pairings traditionally include sauerkraut, endive, kale, spinach, turnip greens, or carrot and onion (the latter combination is known as hutspot). It is usually served with smoked sausage or stewed meat. Stamppot can be purchased premade from shops and supermarkets. It can also be ordered in cafe style restaurants.

The origin of stamppot is unknown but it is a widely known Dutch dish and can be a cheap, hearty and filling meal.

Example:
220px-Boerenkool_stamppot.jpg

Boerenkoolstamppot, with rookworst

taker64 said:
In my part of Canada, those of us with a Polish and Ukrainian heritage are big on perogys (potato dumplings), halopti (cabbage rolls), and kulbassa (coarse, heavily spiced sausage). You can serve it with a surgeon's rib-spreader...

And barszcz and bigos of course. :)
 

mckindog

Living for Sanctuary from the law
Staff member
Foro, that looks like dinner at my in-laws.
(They're both Dutch-born. Each came to Canada as children when their parents emigrated after the war.)
 

mckindog

Living for Sanctuary from the law
Staff member
The stamppot is a staple, but the rest all look familiar except the eel and herring.
And I always get a chocolate letter for Christmas.  :bigsmile:
 

LooseCannon

Enterprise-class aircraft carrier
Staff member
My dad has the following to say:

"I love Holland. The Dutch eat well, drink decent beer, and are incredibly friendly. Also, if you're in a Canadian uniform, it's extremely difficult to pay for your food. What more do you want from a country?"
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
Sounds like a great compliment, not sure if the uniform works everywhere nowadays, but I surely reckon it might do in the cities and villages the Canadians have liberated.  :ok:

mckindog said:
And I always get a chocolate letter for Christmas.  :bigsmile:

Christmas? That's a bit late, isn't it? Tell your in-laws you should get it at December 5th, because that's when the Dutch (and some other Europeans) celebrate Sinterklaas. If they don't do it anymore, then they have become heretics.

;)

This guy is the real one:
220px-Sinterklaas_2007.jpg


And these guys are the fakes:
220px-Jonathan_G_Meath_portrays_Santa_Claus.jpg
 

Albie

Keeping an open eye on the Weeping Angels.
Chicken Tikka Masala. Not exactly my cup of tea (I prefer Lamb Madras), but the legend behind is interesting. The debate rages on as to where it started - some say it was an Indian (or Bangladeshi) restaurant in Glasgow, some say it was Birmingham others say London - but wherever it started, the legend says that a restaurant goer ordered a Chicken Tikka dish. When it arrived, this person thought it looked to dry and asked for some sauce. So the chef came up with a "gravy" (a masala sauce) to accompany the dish (yeap, we love gravy here in the UK) and so the UK's "national dish" was born.
 
Forostar said:
Lots of stuff

Let me just do a few famous ones:

220px-Hollandse_Nieuwe_001.JPG

Hollandse Nieuwe, "new" raw herring

220px-Gerookte_paling.jpeg

Gerookte paling, smoked eel

220px-Frikandel.jpg

A frikandel with french fries

220px-Chocoladeletter_A.jpg

A chocolate letter, a typical Dutch candy, a Sinterklaas present given to children, the first letter of the child's name made out of chocolate, supposedly thrown down the chimney by a Zwarte Piet or Sinterklaas himself

220px-Dutch_apple_pie_Sub_Rosa_Chiang_Mai.jpg

Appeltaart, Dutch apple pie

220px-Oliebollen.jpg

Oliebollen, a Dutch pastry eaten on New Year's Eve

275px-Gaufre_biscuit.jpg

Stroopwafels

I forgot to mention another famous one: Stamppot!

Stamppot (eng. "mash pot") is a traditional Dutch dish made from a combination of potatoes mashed with one or several other vegetables, sometimes also with bacon. These vegetable pairings traditionally include sauerkraut, endive, kale, spinach, turnip greens, or carrot and onion (the latter combination is known as hutspot). It is usually served with smoked sausage or stewed meat. Stamppot can be purchased premade from shops and supermarkets. It can also be ordered in cafe style restaurants.

The origin of stamppot is unknown but it is a widely known Dutch dish and can be a cheap, hearty and filling meal.

Example:
220px-Boerenkool_stamppot.jpg

Boerenkoolstamppot, with rookworst

And barszcz and bigos of course. :)

So, I finally found out about Dutch cuisine! A friend of mine who had been to Amsterdam a couple years before I went there for the first time told me Dutch food was awful, so I ended up not searching for it. Not very intelligent.

Eddies Wingman said:
Norway is a country where the harsh conditions once forced people to do things simple and sometimes brutal - and not letting anything go to waste. Therefore we have things like this:

images


Yes, that is a cooked sheep head. With rutabaga and carrot stew.

I don't think I would eat that, but intellect-wise, it's a good piece of info.


Farhang said:
I`m not gonna talk about all the awesome Persian foods here, but:


Joojeh-Kabab_2.jpg


Joojeh-Kabab_1.jpg



جوجه کباب (Joo-Jeh-Kebab) or Chicken-Kebab + Persian Rice

One of the reasons that I like living.

I want that!
 

Dr. Eddies Wingman

Brighter than thousand_suns
Albie said:
Chicken Tikka Masala. Not exactly my cup of tea (I prefer Lamb Madras), but the legend behind is interesting. The debate rages on as to where it started - some say it was an Indian (or Bangladeshi) restaurant in Glasgow, some say it was Birmingham others say London - but wherever it started, the legend says that a restaurant goer ordered a Chicken Tikka dish. When it arrived, this person thought it looked to dry and asked for some sauce. So the chef came up with a "gravy" (a masala sauce) to accompany the dish (yeap, we love gravy here in the UK) and so the UK's "national dish" was born.

And here I was, thinking that it was fish and chips ...  :p By the way, I like fish and chips.


portermoresby said:
I don't think I would eat that, but intellect-wise, it's a good piece of info.

I've actually never had it myself. I prefer more traditional preparations of sheep, like fårikål:

img_3197_1223135696.jpg


This was actually once (back in the 70s) voted the national dish of Norway, by the listeners of a popular radio program. Personally, I love it. During my years as a student, I've usually either invited friends or been invited for a fårikål feast some time during October. It is served with potatoes on the side, and it's common to drink beer and aquavit to it.
 

Albie

Keeping an open eye on the Weeping Angels.
Forostar said:
Doesn't sound UK 'ish. Not a bit. :)
Eddies Wingman said:
And here I was, thinking that it was fish and chips ...  :p By the way, I like fish and chips.

You're right, it doesn't sound very UKish, but apparently 23 million are served in Indian restaurants each year. Wiki article.

Fish and chips are better, though.
 

national acrobat

Ancient Mariner
English cuisine apparently suffers from a poor reputation, but I wouldn't swap it for anything:

Fish & Chips
Sunday Roasts (especially Roast beef and Yorkshire pud)
Steak & Kidney Pie
Bangers and mash
Shepherd's Pie
Toad-in-the-hole

And I'll take Albie's word on the Tikka Masala, which incidentally I had for lunch today. Top notch nosh!
 

Albie

Keeping an open eye on the Weeping Angels.
national acrobat said:
English cuisine apparently suffers from a poor reputation, but I wouldn't swap it for anything:
And neither would I. :)
 
Top