Bruce Dickinson

Black Wizard

Pleb Hunter
I don't understand why Judas Priest are so bitter about not being inducted. Why do they need this affirmation of their achievements?
 

Zare

Uniformly distributed hostility
Like bearfan said. But that might be the reason they won't ever get the invite - it's obvious they'll decline.
 

Black Bart

Ancient Mariner
I don't understand it either. Kenny could always say: "That's the way it is" instead.
I think it has to do with Judas Priest having actually been a popular mainstream band in the US (the upward curve 82-87, culminating with the Turbo US tour and including a participation to Philadelphia's Live Aid in 1985). The people who went and saw them in concert in those days were potentially the same audience as that of post-Permanent Vacation Aerosmith, Hysteria-period Def Leppard, Van Halen, Scorpions, Motley Crue, Ozzy, 1987-1991 Whistenake and Guns N Roses.

Iron Maiden - I think - stopped short of achieving this status, even in 1984-1985, in terms of "mainstreamness".

In other words, JP had its American period (which I can't say Maiden ever really had - only as a nice accident, even though it has been said that "Flight of Icarus" was a deliberate attempt to seduce the American market) and possibly now feel entitled to being recognized as an RNR inductee - which would make sense regarding what they did in the 80s. Despite the fact I consider JP as a defining metal band, I tend to associate their act to something much lighter than IM and Black Sabbath, in terms of "true metalness" if that ever makes sense. ;)
 
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bearfan

Ancient Mariner
The real reason a lot of really good bands are not in just comes down to all the Rolling Stone (the crap magazine, not the great band) snobs that will never take metal seriously unless they had some breakthrough (like Metallica)
 

Mosh

Winner of the 2020 Dumbest Comment Ever Award
Staff member
I think it has to do with Judas Priest having actually been a popular mainstream band in the US (the upward curve 82-87, culminating with the Turbo US tour and including a participation to Philadelphia's Live Aid in 1985). The people who went and saw them in concert in those days were potentially the same audience as that of post-Permanent Vacation Aerosmith, Hysteria-period Def Leppard, Van Halen, Scorpions, Motley Crue, Ozzy, 1987-1991 Whistenake and Guns N Roses.

Iron Maiden - I think - stopped short of achieving this status, even in 1984-1985, in terms of "mainstreamness".

In other words, JP had its American period (which I can't say Maiden ever really had - only as a nice accident, even though it has been said that "Flight of Icarus" was a deliberate attempt to seduce the American market) and possibly now feel entitled to being recognized as an RNR inductee - which would make sense regarding what they did in the 80s. Despite the fact I consider JP as a defining metal band, I tend to associate their act to something much lighter than IM and Black Sabbath, in terms of "true metalness" if that ever makes sense. ;)
This is pretty much it. You can still hear Priest on the radio and they’re more ingrained in the American classic rock canon than Maiden. The American market has always been important to Priest so it makes sense that they care. I don’t think they will get in though. Apparently even the fan vote showed very little interest (Rush and Kiss had a ton of support there before they were eventually inducted by a reluctant committee).



Re Flight of Icarus: I don’t think it was intentionally written for the American market, but I’m sure the producers and management saw potential right away, hence being the first single.
 

Black Bart

Ancient Mariner
Re Flight of Icarus: I don’t think it was intentionally written for the American market, but I’m sure the producers and management saw potential right away, hence being the first single.
And it turned out that the B-side, the cover of Jethro Tull's "Cross-Eyed Mary", had more airplay anyway! :D
 
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