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Where do you see Iron Maiden going after TBOS ?

Discussion in 'Maiden Chat' started by johnglen, Oct 13, 2015.

  1. Niall Kielt

    Niall Kielt Pulled Her At The Bottle Top

    I agree that RE production on the Blaze albums but The X Factor in particular puzzles me. I like the songs. But there is a sluggish/turgid/ploddy quality to a lot of it. There are moments where the band sound downright disinterested. How could this be allowed? If it was all just down to production then surely somebody would have interjected. Is it possible that everyone was so afraid of Steve that they couldn't question his choice of producer or studio or his own co-production work? I can't really see that. However, if Steve decided that he wanted the album to sound exactly as it does, I can imagine him digging his heels in. I mean, if Steve listened to the playback and wasn't happy then surely he could/would have done something? Twiddled a knob, recruited a professional. Maybe its like the parent who can't admit that their child is ugly as fuck. But aye, maybe I am underestimating the skill and quality of a good producer.
     
  2. LooseCannon

    LooseCannon Yorktown-class aircraft carrier Staff Member

    I think Steve was happy with the production. I think he wanted the music to sound dreary and sludgy and brutal, and he was pleased with that sound. He's said many times that it's a very personal album for him. I'm not saying I agree with Steve. I quite like The X Factor, but part of me is curious what it would have sounded like if Martin Birch had mixed it.
     
  3. TheTalisman

    TheTalisman F├ągel

    I remember seeing an interview with Blaze when he said that that the first time everyone played the songs together at the same time was at the rehearsals for The X Factour, perhaps that can explain some things. Maybe was a video interview from 1995 or the fanclub magazine from that time, I can't remember now.
     
  4. Niall Kielt

    Niall Kielt Pulled Her At The Bottle Top

    Absolutely, I am a big fan of the album but will admit that there is a certain something missing at times and maybe Birch or someone would of made it better. Still, I appreciate it for what it is
     
    TheTalisman likes this.
  5. Mosh

    Mosh The years just pass like trains Staff Member

    I remember a similar interview where he mentioned that he was surprised that they'd rehearse a song like Sign of the Cross without being able to get through the whole thing and then decide to go ahead and record.

    I've actually been really into X Factor lately. It's one of those albums that gets a little better every time I listen to it. That being said, it lays the foundation for better things later on. As far as the production goes, I don't even think Birch is necessary. The X Factor seems to be going for a similar raw sound that they get with Kevin Shirley. Say what you will about Shirley, but I imagine most people would agree that the Shirley produced albums are mostly better than X Factor sonically.
     
    srfc likes this.
  6. srfc

    srfc Educated Fool

    If the X Factor was recorded by Shirley with current line-up it would be as good an album as any of the reunion ones. I think it has a lot more in common with the reunion era than the 80's or other 90's albums.
     
    JudasMyGuide likes this.
  7. Zare

    Zare Dream of broken citadels



    Imagine that whole The X Factor album had been produced in this manner.
     
  8. SirRobbins

    SirRobbins Ancient Mariner

    they're done making new albums..... that's how I feel. TBOS is a great album to end their career with. TFF was not.... they have been on a hit or miss deal for awhile from my prospective with their albums...

    probably see 2 more tours history related to something, whether it be the Legacy game or whatever.
     
  9. Operations666

    Operations666 Educated Fool

    Why would they be done making new albums? I fully expect one more album.
     
    Diesel 11 likes this.
  10. Diesel 11

    Diesel 11 Gott Mit Uns

    Same. I'd expect at least one more album before they officially call it quits. Everyone looks and sounds like they're up to it.
     
    Operations666 likes this.
  11. Welsh Phantom

    Welsh Phantom Educated Fool

    For my ears, the biggest problem is that the drums are so damn loud in the mix. It sucks the energy out of the guitars.

    Man on the Edge has loads of energy, and if you play that back to back with the other songs, just listen how much louder the guitars are on that one song, with the drums pulled back a little, and everything then sounds great.

    It is a great album, with a bad mix in terms of drums and guitars.
     
  12. Wayne Bond

    Wayne Bond Nomad

    Why do people always say the 90's were bad for metal???

    I hear this a lot along with how grunge killed metal blah blah blah. Pantera were one of the biggest bands on the planet in the 90's and there were hardly a timid band with a soft sound! Machine head were big plus slipknot emerged and became a major force. Then you've got all the fantastic death metal that came through the 90's. Bands like obituary, morbid angel, cannibal corpse, Death, carcass, napalm death and many more all released career best albums in the 90's. Metallica might have watered down their songs but they became massive and still played plenty of classic stuff on their tours. Megadeth released some quality stuff and so did slayer.

    I got into metal and the very start of the 90's and found loads of great albums and. If metal tours to see. People seem to easy to dismiss 90's metal which puzzles me.

    Off topic I know but whenever I see someone diss the 90's to me it sounds like a cliche these days.
     
    CriedWhenBrucieLeft likes this.
  13. LooseCannon

    LooseCannon Yorktown-class aircraft carrier Staff Member

    I think it matters on where you lived and what media you were tuned into at the time. I was not tuned into the metal bandwidth in the 1990s, and I hadn't heard of any of the big names until the end of the decade.
     
  14. Brigantium

    Brigantium Work Geordie for hire Staff Member

    It retreated further from mainstream culture in the 90s, imo. Ostentatious 80s excess was really sniffed at in the early 90s in particular. The metal that came to the forefront was more gritty.
     
  15. jazz from hell

    jazz from hell Ancient Mariner

    I would like to see them jam more.
     
  16. Diesel 11

    Diesel 11 Gott Mit Uns

    More tea, Vicar?
     
  17. jazz from hell

    jazz from hell Ancient Mariner

    Doesn't rock imo. More like Nicko sometimes, every night different, play loser and improvise more, but with relentless groove.
     
  18. Diesel 11

    Diesel 11 Gott Mit Uns

    You misunderstood. I was asking if you'd like another cup.

    But while you're here, pass the jam, would you please?
     
  19. Niall Kielt

    Niall Kielt Pulled Her At The Bottle Top

    That is true and adds to my confusion with the album as a whole. Fortunes of War, The Aftermath and Edge of Darkness could all be classics. Edge of Darkness is pretty much Maiden in a nutshell. But a combination of personnel (thats for assholes), performance and production have conspired against the Blaze albums I hate to make comparisons but, really, truly, The X Factor with good production and maybe Bruce but more so Adrian's influence on the songs would be class. Its not that I want it to be different, its just that when I hear criticism of it I always feel that people maybe miss its potential and don't hear its good points. And Adrian or a proper producer would lift this album from a 'cult classic' to a Genuine Classic. BUT, I love the album and as they say in Russia, 'if yer granny had balls she would be yer granda'
     
    Welsh Phantom, Zare and Diesel 11 like this.
  20. Mr Chippy

    Mr Chippy Prowler

    I think both The X Factor and Virtual XI are solid releases with some really refreshing aspects to them. I think if the band paid more attention to them today fans would maybe re-engage with them and appreciate them for what they are. I listened to them a lot during the 90's but perhaps they're hard to approach for new fans.
     

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