SABATON SURVIVOR 2017: Results -> All together... GOTT MIT UNS!

Are you satisfied with the results?


  • Total voters
    10

JudasMyGuide

Servus inutilis
Could we just agree that CS is meant to be from the point of view of Israel and therefore making clearer lines in the morally grey conflict? Just like with Afraid to Shoot Strangers, for example?
 

Brigantium

Grim Reaper
Staff member
Yep, most of Sabaton's songs are from the point of view of one side or an individual character at the time.
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
No. ATSS has none of the elements that bother me so much (just read Sabaton topic page 8). I didn't want to redo the whole discussion but couldn't ignore "accurate depiction".
 

MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
;)

EDIT:

Voting for:
- both Metal songs
- all bonus tracks (although Nightchild is solid)
- Into the Fire
- Purple Heart
- In the Name of God
- We Burn
- Back in Control
 
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MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
And for album #2!

Attero Dominatus
Sabaton’s second album falls prey to the sophomore blues – as this remains the band’s darkest, most introspective record to date. Joakim Brodén and Par Sundström must have been undergoing immense pressure and sadness while making this album, as the overall tone of the music and lyrics is a wild departure from the upbeat, party-atmosphere of Primo Victoria.

Attero Dominatus – The first track is dark, virtually opaque, showing zero signs of hope as our heroes, The Third Reich, fall at the hands of the evil Allied Forces. The initial chanting of the chorus with large gaps of silence punctuates that loss with incredible drama. We charge full speed ahead into the track, with powerful verses and pre-choruses full of pain and loss. The chorus repeats each time with added power as voices rise to beat down the Axis into unwarranted submission. Guitars duel and spiral their way into solos in a sweeping, grand march towards the songs vocal climax with the Allied soldiers reigning their victorious tyranny over Berlin. The city burns, the Nazis fall, and we all reflect on the loss of our friends in Germany. A great song and a great opener, with Joakim’s crystal-clear voice ringing out the final line and letting us know that we are in for a much darker, much more solemn Sabaton record. 10/10

Nuclear Attack – As if the first track wasn’t brooding enough, we come to this glum, plodding and incredibly heavy number. Vocals kick us off once again as a riff drags us down to witness the fall of another great nation: the strong and valiant Japan. A nuclear attack comes to their shores and this song does an incredible job of making the listener feel that tension. The pre-chorus with the B-29’s leads us right into the nuclear attack and the twisting, snakelike bridge that culminates in a guitar solo echoes the cries of thousands of innocent soldiers and civilians who never expected to lose their lives to the atomic bomb. The key change at the end is the only misstep, as it makes the song sound a bit more triumphant than it should considering the depressing subject matter of the glorious Axis powers losing another stronghold. 9/10

Rise of Evil – Finally we come to track three, the most energetic and immediate song on the whole album. The lyrics describe the early career of the album’s fallen hero – Adolf Hitler. Bass and drums lead the way with a lovely groove that the guitars build over nicely with a stellar set of riffs accented by ghostly, haunting keyboards. The music in the beginning here is really amazing stuff that shows the immense creativity of the songwriters. The odd meters during the pre-chorus speak to the oddity of the German people who could not initially see the glory of the Reich. The anthemic chorus shouts, “The Reich will rise!” intercut with biting guitars that send shivers down my spine. During the keyboard-lead bridge, Joakim celebrates “the eagle rising” and points out the irony of those viewing it as “the rise of evil.” We break down into an energetic, church-choir part featuring some of Joakim’s most perfectly recorded, least shaky vocals of all time. The melodies here are simply God-sent. Who will stop our hero? “No man, No land.” Will they “stop the Holocaust?” No, “The Reich will rise.” Subtle keyboards guide us into a bluesy guitar solo that is actually a little bit overdone and masturbatory for such a tune, but it still works. The outro brings in a march as Hitler goosesteps his way into their hearts. In a day and age where everyone seems to act more and more politically correct, it’s great to know that these musicians with firm roots in the Neo-Nazi party can put out such an ode to their favorite hero without facing backlash. This is the briefest track on the album and is not perfect, but the strength lies in that brevity and it’s ultimately very well done. 9/10

In the Name of God – This one has a great swing and swagger to it, with stops and hits that really accent the overwhelming feeling of injustice inspired by terrorism. “Stand up and show me your face” points out the cowardice of those who kill and claim to be inspired by the heavens above. It’s no coincidence that this track is placed right after Rise of Evil, in which Sabaton glorifies the man who showed his face to all while proclaiming his beliefs. The guitar solo is simplistic, but meaningful if you take every note to be a critique of the insanity of these terrorists. Chants burst in at the bridge and it feels like the lyrics are a bit cramped, but maybe that’s the point? The lyrics are cramped underground like these terrorists. It may be a bigger poetic compositional choice than I first thought. 7/10

We Burn – A similar tale to that of Joakim Brodén’s personal hero, this time the massacre occurs in Serbia. Powerful drums and keyboard open up this barnburner of a track, with sorrowful and mournful chords before the riffs kick into high gear. The lyrics are from the point of view of Radovan Karadzic, but might as well come from Joakim and Par themselves as the words clearly demonstrate their self-importance and belief in ethnic and religious cleansing. There’s nothing new here, unfortunately, and there are better Sabaton songs that celebrate mass murder. 6/10

Angels Calling – Interesting keyboard effects and violins bring the mood for this track that is lead by a killer riff. The drums sync up with each hit of the riff, an oddity for Sabaton. Joakim once again reveals that amazing range we’ve come to expect of his vocals, reaching nearly 4 ½ octaves over the course of the tune. The melodic structure here is rather impressive for Sabaton, with distinct verses, pre-chorus, and choruses. We have a nice guitar solo and the return of an incredibly subtle keyboard patch before breaking down into a great groove that calls to mind the angels marching forth to deliver the broken body of Archduke Franz Ferdinand to heaven. A second guitar solo substitutes for the choir of angels that any lesser band would have placed in a song such as this. Joakim hits the highest note of his career at the end with the line, “Calling you home…” and the song ends nicely. 8/10

Back in Control – Another dramatic opening holds our hand as we hear a story of British supremacy. The song pummels along like the English pummeled the Argentinians who dared try to reclaim islands near their homeland. The nonstop pace of the song perfectly echoes the themes of upward mobility and the pride of conquering nations. The lyrics even keep in the style of cheeky British humor by referencing our favorite metal band Iron Maiden and the Vulcans from Star Trek! The quiet chorus at the end feels like it comes in a measure too late and the final key change is a bit forced, but this is still a decent song. Not the best on the album by any means, but a nice reminder that Europeans deserve land because they say so. 6/10

A Light in the Black – Guitar and piano interplay in a lovely jig to kick off this rousing number. Once the full band comes in, we’re off to a rollicking and driving slow gallop. The lyrics are solemn and heartfelt and it is at this point that we realize that the members of Sabaton may in fact be combat veterans themselves! Finally, we can comprehend why these themes are so close to their hearts. They sing of fallen comrades, brothers in arms, and the price paid for battle. The chorus is anthemic, the guitar solo is wonderful, and there’s another chant bridge that still feels incredibly unique. It is similar to Purple Heart from Primo Victoria, but this time we’re on the inside looking out. No doubt the songwriters were thinking back to the sacrifices of those courageous German, Japanese, and Serbian soldiers who served under their proud democratic leaders spoken of in earlier songs. 8/10

Metal Crue – In the only instance of Sabaton repeating themselves we get another closing track that has nothing to do with the serious introspections on war, but once again drops names of metal bands. It’s almost as lame as the first time around, though this one does have a nice harmonized guitar section in the middle and namechecks Armored Saint, so at least I’ll give it an extra point or two. 3/10

Album Rating – 7.3/10
 

Lampwick 43

Barstool Warrior
I finally got around to giving these albums a listen. Panzer Battalion, Into the Fire, and Purple Heart stand out as initial favorites on the first album. The second album is much more consistent in quality, but I'm finding it more difficult to pick out my favorites. Right now I'll go with the title track and Rise of Evil.

I'll refrain from voting voting for the "metal" songs for right now, because they put a big smile on my face. Although it's almost impossible to take those songs seriously.

Voting for the bonus tracks + Reign of Terror
 
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MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
I finally got around to giving these albums a listen. Panzer Battalion, Into the Fire, and Purple Heart stand out as initial favorites on the first album. The second album is much more consistent in quality, but I'm finding it more difficult to pick out my favorites. Right now I'll go with the title track and Rise of Evil.
AD is certainly the better, more consistent album, but the great tracks on PV are better than the great AD tracks.
 

Detective Beauregard

Independent as a hog on ice
If I had to pick three favorites from each album...

Primo Victoria
Panzer Battalion
Wolfpack (duh)

Attero Dominatus
Nuclear Attack
Rise of Evil (I think this is actually their longest song)

Of the above, however, only Wolfpack is in my Top 10 Sabaton.

The last track on each album is an abomination, with Metal Crue being slightly more tolerable. I've never liked metal that plays up cliche metal stereotypes, and these two songs are worse offenders than Metallica's debut album.

These two albums show a style of the band that they unfortunately lost with their last few efforts: lengthier tracks. They reached their peak, in my opinion, with Art of War through Carolus Rex (an album which seems beloved by all but one which I hold lower than others because I prefer my Sabaton singing about guns), with their last few albums being more direct and punchy. This isn't necessarily a negative thing, as some of their best tracks (e.g. Night Witches, Soldier of 3 Armies, The Last Battle, Winged Hussars) are featured, but I feel the band has lost a bit of the magic of their earlier days.
 

MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
These two albums show a style of the band that they unfortunately lost with their last few efforts: lengthier tracks. They reached their peak, in my opinion, with Art of War through Carolus Rex (an album which seems beloved by all but one which I hold lower than others because I prefer my Sabaton singing about guns), with their last few albums being more direct and punchy. This isn't necessarily a negative thing, as some of their best tracks (e.g. Night Witches, Soldier of 3 Armies, The Last Battle, Winged Hussars) are featured, but I feel the band has lost a bit of the magic of their earlier days.
This is 100% true, and I do miss the longer songs, but I think the overall quality has come up with Sabaton albums. These earlier albums are surprisingly patchy with lots of peaks and valleys in terms of quality. I feel like the last three albums are stronger throughout than these first couple records. If the trade off is better songs but shorter lengths, I'll take it. I don't listen to Sabaton for epics.
 

Brigantium

Grim Reaper
Staff member
I do think short songs work especially well as part of a live set as far as Sabaton is concerned. There's less chance of audience members' attention wandering, and it gives the impression of an all-action, high energy show.
 

JudasMyGuide

Servus inutilis
Am I weird? It seems I really love the debut as a whole. Doesn't help me with picking which songs to vote against.

Why in the seven fucks does Reign of Terror have the most votes out of all the regular PV tracks?
 
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