Prodigal Son

How good is Prodigal Son on a scale of 1-10?


  • Total voters
    69

Number 6

Ancient Mariner
Not bad, not great, just good. It's enjoyable enough to keep me from skipping it when listening to the whole album and has a nice little melody throughout. Di'Anno's performance is also very good. 6.
 

Desdemona

Trooper
7/10
Not incredibly memorable but there's nothing very wrong with it. The idea behind the lyrics is much more interesting than the lyrics themselves. Gets somewhat boring after the solo.
 

Jer

Yes, Yes, Another Beer!
Very nice acoustic opening and extended intro section. Love this vibe, which is very unusual for Maiden.

This fades into an appealing verse with a nice vocal from Paul. The pre-chorus ("I'm on my knees...") is a little blah, but the chorus picks things up again. The vocal phrasing isn't the best on the chorus, but it's not too distracting.

Then we're treated to a really good pair of electric solos on top of a variation on the acoustic intro, which is again a great and unusual vibe for this band.

This works its way back around to the chorus and another intro reprise before a classy cymbal crescendo wraps things up.

There are a couple of weaker elements here, but for the most part it's great. 8/10.
 

Diesel 11

As you scream into the web of silence...
Probably Maiden's weirdest song. There's a lot I don't care for, but I think I'm finally getting it. Paul sounds great, the solos are good... it's up for the first time ever. 4/10.
 
You know you wanted to know who Lamia was, well here you go:

LAMIA, NOW AND THEN
November 8, 2013 by stevenrbailey
In John Keats’s poem Lamia, we are treated to the tale of a creature cursed by the gods to be serpentine who is then allowed to circumvent her curse and take human form again and pursue her love. Being a poem of the Gothic tradition, there must, of course, be a tragic element. The Lamia is discovered and in the process, is forced to leave, and her love dies in the process. Despite being a little demanding (“You have deserted me;-where am I now?”, Damrosch 1024) and shrieking upon her discovery, Keats’s Lamia is fairly demure compared with other incarnations of the creature.

In the original myth, for example, her original transformation sees her cursed so that she “devours the children of others” after losing all of her own. In later incarnations, the Lamia becomes a seductress, luring away young men to their demise. In still later versions of the myth, she was further cursed with eyes that wouldn’t close so that she was forced to watch her treachery. Though her aggression seems to be somewhat muted by Keats, it appears that Keats was the one of the first to give the Lamia a partially serpentine body. Previously, she had simply been monstrous, with no particular attributes assigned.

In more modern incarnations, writers have taken various takes on the traditional Lamia. In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy game, there are even two varieties of Lamia: one similar to Keats’s depiction with the lower body of a snake, and one with the lower body of a lion. In Neil Gaiman’s novel and BBC TV show, Neverwhere, Lamia was one of the “velvets,” who were “vampire-like seductresses, dressed in dark velvet, who suck the warmth from their victims.” On another BBC show, Merlin, the Lamia is visually a run-of-the-mill beautiful girl, but she possesses serpent blood who is able to cause “discord and violence among the men around her.” Even in music, the demoness is referenced in a 1981 song by Iron Maiden called “Prodigal Son.” In an appeal to the Lamia for aid, the lyrics seem to appeal to her for saving because “I’ve got this curse, I’m turning to bad,” a plight the Lamia would no doubt understand.

Compared to the various versions of her throughout culture the Lamia serves as an iconic representation of temptation, tragedy, and the fall of man. Though the physical form changes, there seems to be one constant with the Lamia: she takes or deprives something desired from her victims. Thanks to John Keats, we have the Lamia’s entry into pop culture as an iconic mythical being who has been drawn upon for the inspiration of many works since.

WORKS CITED

“Lamia.” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 22 July 2004. Web. 8 Nov. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamia>

“Lamia (Dungeons & Dragons).” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 22 July 2004. Web. 8 Nov. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamia>

“Neverwhere.” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 22 July 2004. Web. 8 Nov. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neverwhere>

Keats, John. “Lamia,” The Longman Anthology of British Literature. 4th ed. Damrosch, David, and Kevin J.H. Dettmar. New York: Pearson Education Inc., 2010. 176-203. Print.

Iron Maiden. “Prodigal Son.” Killers. 1981. MP3.
 

Kalata

Out of the Silent Planet
This is the only Maiden song that I gave a rating of 4/10. Only the acoustic riffs and the solos are good.

But my question is: Does they really considered it and rehearsed it for the Early Days tour in 2005 ? I mean, it was a strange decision that they even played CTH twice.
 
Last edited:

matic22

Ancient Mariner
This is the only Maiden song that I gave a rating of 4/10.

But my question is: Does they really considered it and rehearsed it for the Early Days tour in 2005 ? I mean, it was a strange decision that they even played CTH twice.

Where did you hear that? Are you making stuff up?
 

matic22

Ancient Mariner
I'm not making any stuff, calm down mate. I think I heard it here, on this forum. I can't remember well, but I'm sure I heard it. If someone knows....
The only thing that was said about Prodigal Son from the band in the last 20 years is that it's one of Bruce's top 3 DiAnno tracks along with Killers and Murders.

That said, it's the only track from Killers that wasn't performed live, so I think it will remain that way.
 

Kalata

Out of the Silent Planet
The only thing that was said about Prodigal Son from the band in the last 20 years is that it's one of Bruce's top 3 DiAnno tracks along with Killers and Murders.

I'm sure I heard that. Anyway, what about POTO... I think it is one of Bruce's favorite songs and it has to be in his top 3 Di'Anno tracks.
 

Number 6

Ancient Mariner
Really ? I think he once said that if you don't like this song then you don't like Maiden or so.
Not being in his top 3 doesn't mean he doesn't love the song. I agree with him in what he said and I love the song, and it isn't in my top 3 either (my overall top 3, but still).
 
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