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Night Prowler

Customer Deathcycle Manager
Staff member
Reading The Martian by Andy Weir. Guy is part of the third crew to land on Mars. Gets lost in a storm, his crew departs thinking he is dead and he is left all alone without a way to communicate with Earth. Next crew is scheduled to arrive in 4 years so he decides to try and survive until then. Very interesting so far.
 

Maturin

Sköldpadda
Veniss Underground by Jeff VanderMeer
2312 by Kim Stanley Robinson
Chasm City by Alastair Reynolds
Only Young Twice by Mattias Kling (Inofficial biography of Europe)
Rockstjärnan Gud glömde (eng. "The Rockstar God Forgot"), the autobiography by Kee Marcello (guitarplayer of Europe 1986-1992)

Veniss Underground was not a light read, to say the least, and as such it is a novel that takes a long time so sink in. With Chasm City I have now read all 11 published novels by Alastair Reynolds. This I would say is among his better. A novel with some well timed plot twists that turns the story around completely. 2312 was good at times, but had no plot to hold it together and I can't even remember what it was about. A real disappoinment, really.
 

Night Prowler

Customer Deathcycle Manager
Staff member
Just finished reading Blake Crouch's "Pines". It's an amazing book.

"Secret service agent Ethan Burke arrives in Wayward Pines, Idaho, with mission to locate and recover two federal agents who went missing in the town. But within minutes of his arrival, Ethan is involved in a violent accident. He comes to in a hospital, with no ID, no cell phone, and no briefcase. The medical staff seems friendly enough, but something feels…off."

This is just tip of the iceberg. I strongly suggest you don't read the longer synopsises, 'cause most of them are drowning in spoilers. Either way, this book (and the sequel called "Wayward") is gonna be adapted into a FOX TV series called "Wayward Pines". It's gonna premiere in the summer. Even though the book is great, I think that the TV show has the potential to be even better. Some of the stuff from the book could have more impact in a visual form (assuming it follows the book, but who knows).
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
This is not about something I am reading, but I found this comment on a book, made by a collegue of mine funny enough to share:
I am by no means a fast man. I'm all for slow: slow cooking, slow living, slow art. But sometimes things are getting too slow even to my taste. I have now read 350 pages of "A Glastonbury Romance" by John Cowper Powys, and I start to worry if the novel will ever get beyond the stage of "introduction". True: we're not even at one-third of the novel, but still... Let something, anything, happen in the next, let's say, 150 pages? Please?

Will the novel ever get beyond the stage of "introduction"!

Ghehe, brilliant. :)
 

Night Prowler

Customer Deathcycle Manager
Staff member
Now reading:
- The Atlantis Gene (The Origin Mystery, Book 1) by A.G. Riddle - Apocalyptic/conspiracy book in the vein of Dan Brown's books. But better. Two more books in the series.
- Walking In The Shadow Of Death (Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Book 4) by W.J. Lundy - Action packed book with (fast) zombies, first 3 books were set in Afghanistan, this one's set in Canada.
 

Night Prowler

Customer Deathcycle Manager
Staff member
Just finished reading Blake Crouch's "Pines". It's an amazing book.

"Secret service agent Ethan Burke arrives in Wayward Pines, Idaho, with mission to locate and recover two federal agents who went missing in the town. But within minutes of his arrival, Ethan is involved in a violent accident. He comes to in a hospital, with no ID, no cell phone, and no briefcase. The medical staff seems friendly enough, but something feels…off."

This is just tip of the iceberg. I strongly suggest you don't read the longer synopsises, 'cause most of them are drowning in spoilers. Either way, this book (and the sequel called "Wayward") is gonna be adapted into a FOX TV series called "Wayward Pines". It's gonna premiere in the summer. Even though the book is great, I think that the TV show has the potential to be even better. Some of the stuff from the book could have more impact in a visual form (assuming it follows the book, but who knows).
Aaaaand here's the trailer for the TV show:
Based on this, I can say they're sticking closely to the books and I'm liking it a lot :D
 
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MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
Rereading Jim Butcher's Cold Days before the release of Skin Game next week. I'll be going to my first ever book signing and my first convention in over ten years in celebration! w00t!
 

Night Prowler

Customer Deathcycle Manager
Staff member
Timothy Ashby - Time Fall
Lt. Art Sutton and his war-weary Special Forces team parachute into Nazi Germany in 1945 to destroy targets behind enemy lines. What they don't know: during the jump they have somehow warped through time. They land in deeply forested Germany--in 2011. They start blowing things up. The young soldiers feel like heroes; the present-day German police hunt them down like the terrorists they appear to be; US forensics experts race to uncover the identity of a mysteriously intact body wearing WWII dog tags.
 

MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
Just finished the latest Dresden Files novel, Skin Game, and loved it! I got to meet Jim Butcher at a book signing/Q&A last night and now I'm headed to Phoenix Comic Con to see him speak on panels and generally revel in the nerdiness of it all.
 

Maturin

Sköldpadda
Picked up American Gods by Neil Gaiman at the airport to have something to read on my vacation.

I absolutely despised his much acclaimed novel The Ocean at the End of the Lane and swore that I would never read another book by Gaiman. It felt like a work that said "Okay, you're right - fantasy really is childish. But look at this! This is grown up literature!" American Gods thankfully is another work completely and a novel that I really liked.
 

MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
Picked up American Gods by Neil Gaiman at the airport to have something to read on my vacation.

I absolutely despised his much acclaimed novel The Ocean at the End of the Lane and swore that I would never read another book by Gaiman. It felt like a work that said "Okay, you're right - fantasy really is childish. But look at this! This is grown up literature!" American Gods thankfully is another work completely and a novel that I really liked.

Was The Ocean at the End of the Lane your first Gaiman experience? Although I do not despise the book, it is certainly quite different from most of his writing. Honestly, it more closely resembles his children's/young adult stories but without all the magical whimsy. His second most recent book, The Graveyard Book, is sold as a children's book, but it is light years better than Ocean. Definitely worth checking out.

American Gods is incredible. If you liked it, read Anansi Boys. Not as good, but is sort of a spin-of from AG. Neil Gaimain's older work is quite fun and dark, check out Neverwhere and Good Omens (co-written by Terry Pratchett). The latter is especially good if you're looking for a bit of silliness. Gaimain's short story collections, Fragile Things and Smoke and Mirrors are quite good, as well.

I find myself rereading the entire run of Sandman more than any of Gaiman's novels.
 

Maturin

Sköldpadda
Yes, wasn't familiar at all with his work before Ocean, but I have seen his name around since forever so I figured I'd read something of his eventually.

I'm already planning on reading more. I will probably order Stardust, Neverwhere, Anansi Boys and what more I can get in one go, as I usually do when I find an author worth reading.
 

LooseCannon

Enterprise-class aircraft carrier
Staff member
You only mentioned one bad thing.

But I dunno if I want a new Harry Potter book right now, because I just finished reading The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith (better known as JK Rowling), and I loved it, and I want more of THAT.

Cormoran Strike is a private detective, recently of the British Army's investigative section, but he decided to call his career quits when an IED took his leg. Suffering from a breakup and a pile of debt, he's unable to get any cases that actually pay until the day his new temp secretary starts. She introduces him to John Bristol, who hires him to look into his sister's murder. Of course Strike's heard of the death - Lulu Landry, the famous supermodel...but the inquest says she committed suicide.

Overall, I think that it was a really good whodunit, and I had pretty much figured it out about 2/3rds of the way through (but you're supposed to figure it out). I recommend it to anyone who likes mysteries...but if you only like Harry Potter, maybe it isn't for you.
 

Night Prowler

Customer Deathcycle Manager
Staff member
For years I've been saying that if she ever decides to release a new Harry Potter book, it should be released on 1 September 2017 :D

These new books she's releasing aren't really interesting to me, but I did buy The Casual Vacancy although I haven't read it yet.
 

JackKnife

A Vivid example of masculine pulchritude
I'm reading "Joukov. L'homme qui a vaincu Hitler" by Jean Lopez and Lasha Otkhmezuri. It's brilliant !


Jean Lopez et Lasha Otkhmezuri, Joukov. L'homme qui a vaincu Hitler, Paris, Perrin, 2013, 732 p.
 

JackKnife

A Vivid example of masculine pulchritude
I just finished another book dealing with the second world war: Richard H. Hillary, The Last Enemy (in French Le dernier ennemi : bataille d'Angleterre, juin 1940-mai 1941).


It is a hugely poignant story that teaches the narrator's experiences during the battle of Britain and gives a more general idea of how the young English men of higher social class perceived their role in the war. Aces High.​
 
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