Isle of Avalon

How good is Isle of Avalon on a scale of 1-10?


  • Total voters
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  • Poll closed .
instrumental section is uplifting, soaring even - Dave's intro solo is classic Dave, then 'Arry comes in with the deep bass note runs (no more "rickety" 'Arry bass notes of his youth), H takes flight and pauses to enjoy the lush, verdant scenery of his bandmates riffing below. He then switches to a "rhythm as lead" style (Alex Lifeson of Rush used this technique beautifully on "Afterimage" from Grace Under Pressure - among other songs), and then Bruce re-enters with his glorious refrain.

one of my favorite moments in music
 
instrumental section is uplifting, soaring even - Dave's intro solo is classic Dave, then 'Arry comes in with the deep bass note runs (no more "rickety" 'Arry bass notes of his youth), H takes flight and pauses to enjoy the lush, verdant scenery of his bandmates riffing below. He then switches to a "rhythm as lead" style (Alex Lifeson of Rush used this technique beautifully on "Afterimage" from Grace Under Pressure - among other songs), and then Bruce re-enters with his glorious refrain.

one of my favorite moments in music

Not to mention how impactful the return to the intro progression is after the peak described above
 

Eliot1988

Educated Fool
I can not understand the meaning of this piece in the lyrics. can someone in simple words if they want to explain to me what the piece wants to say?
 

Black Abyss Babe

Quantum weather butterfly
I can not understand the meaning of this piece in the lyrics. can someone in simple words if they want to explain to me what the piece wants to say?
I don't think it can be explained both simply and adequately because it's complicated and there are a lot of references. But in a nutshell it explores a number of pagan celtic legends surrounding the Isle of Avalon/Western Isle of the Dead (Glastonbury in Somerset), mostly to do with the earth's fertility (ie for growing food: "the fruits of her body") represented by and/or connected to human fertility (a woman's ability to produce children: "fertility of all mothers") and a male sacrifice, the "Year King" (the song's narrator), to The Goddess ("Mother Earth"). In this worldview death is not the end but the gateway to regeneration ("to die and be transferred into the earth and then for rebirth").

When I was first researching this song I found the following article which explains most of the references (Annwyn, corn dolls, the nineteen maidens etc), but I was struck by how many times actual lyrics from the song are found in the text ("keepers of (the mysteries of) the Goddess", "sacrifice now united", "the waters in (the) rivers and rhynes rises quickly", "the fruits of her body"). I wouldn't be surprised if Steve has an old dead tree copy of this somewhere in his cavernous library.

The article can be found here, but should come with a warning: pagans are not at all squeamish about going into details :D
 

Eliot1988

Educated Fool
I don't think it can be explained both simply and adequately because it's complicated and there are a lot of references. But in a nutshell it explores a number of pagan celtic legends surrounding the Isle of Avalon/Western Isle of the Dead (Glastonbury in Somerset), mostly to do with the earth's fertility (ie for growing food: "the fruits of her body") represented by and/or connected to human fertility (a woman's ability to produce children: "fertility of all mothers") and a male sacrifice, the "Year King" (the song's narrator), to The Goddess ("Mother Earth"). In this worldview death is not the end but the gateway to regeneration ("to die and be transferred into the earth and then for rebirth").

When I was first researching this song I found the following article which explains most of the references (Annwyn, corn dolls, the nineteen maidens etc), but I was struck by how many times actual lyrics from the song are found in the text ("keepers of (the mysteries of) the Goddess", "sacrifice now united", "the waters in (the) rivers and rhynes rises quickly", "the fruits of her body"). I wouldn't be surprised if Steve has an old dead tree copy of this somewhere in his cavernous library.

The article can be found here, but should come with a warning: pagans are not at all squeamish about going into details :D
very interesting! thank you! immerse yourself more in the song!
 
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