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European Politics

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Forostar, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. Brigantium

    Brigantium Work Geordie for hire Staff Member

    I get the impression they were overconfident, hence calling this election in the first place. They've made themselves the party of Brexit, but Labour aren't out to block Brexit. They've maybe been too distracted by the idea of trying to bring Tories with UKIP leanings back into the fold. They just assume that the default position of the centre ground is vote Conservative, and discounted genuine widespread fear about the future of the NHS and permanent austerity.
     
  2. AlexS

    AlexS Trooper

    Another question from a semi-ignorant Yank too lazy to do 30 minutes of research: it's apparent that Theresa May has been badly weakened by this election. Who are the next potential Tory leaders waiting in the wings who could replace her in the near future?
     
  3. Brigantium

    Brigantium Work Geordie for hire Staff Member

    I don't really think there are any credible ones. Jeremy Hunt or one of the other most outspoken cabinet members, maybe? Boris Johnson gets talked about a lot (he's former Mayor of London) but I'm not sure his cheerful oaf act is a good one for a national leader. There was a bit of an exodus after the Brexit referendum and resulting leadership contest last year.
     
    Forostar likes this.
  4. Night Prowler

    Night Prowler ɹǝlʍoɹԀ ʇɥƃᴉN Staff Member

    We're in search of a new prime-minister, since the current quit to become president. Prime candidate is a lesbian who by all accounts is qualified for the job but the church is lobbying against her <_<
     
  5. Black Wizard

    Black Wizard Out of the Silent Planet

    Boris Johnson would be the obvious candidate. He's currently favourite with the bookmakers and probably very popular with the core Conservative electorate. The next on the list is David Davis (silly name), the Brexit Secretary, but he's already lost a leadership election to David Cameron. Third on the bookmakers list is, bizarrely, Ruth Davidson, the leader of the Scottish Conservatives. She's done a great job at bringing the party back from the brink of oblivion in Scotland but she doesn't have a seat at Westminster and being leader of the opposition in the Scottish parliament is hardly a great qualification for being Prime Minister. Plus she's not really a proper Tory either and seems more like a normal person.

    The best thing the Conservatives could do now would be to bring David Cameron back. He actually tried to modernize the party in a similar fashion to what Tony Blair did with the Labour party. Theresa May has pretty much taken the party backwards by bringing up stupid crap like fox hunting again.
     
  6. CriedWhenBrucieLeft

    CriedWhenBrucieLeft Ancient Mariner

    :funnypost:
     
  7. Zare

    Zare Dream of broken citadels

    A Croat lesbian you say?

    [​IMG]
     
  8. CriedWhenBrucieLeft

    CriedWhenBrucieLeft Ancient Mariner

    Maybe some fellow Brits can enlighten me on what thing regarding the general election that I don't quite understand.

    Ignoring the politics (& pressure that might be brought to bear on the sitting government), from a purely practical perspective how does the Conservative minority (specifically them not having a majority in parliament) have any bearing on the Brexit negotiation?; since the Conservatives have never said they'll return to the UK parliament for a final vote on the "deal" they've secured with the EU. As I understand it, there's nothing compelling the sitting government to require any further vote in regard to Brexit. Therefore, why does a majority matter? I understand how the everyday running of parliament, which does indeed require legislation to be brought before the parliament and voted on, needs (or it's good to have) a majority government; but Brexit? I'm not following. Or have I missed something here?
     
  9. Black Wizard

    Black Wizard Out of the Silent Planet

    Theresa May wants to put through a "Great Repeal Bill", which would have been somewhat easier with a large majority in parliament.
     
  10. CriedWhenBrucieLeft

    CriedWhenBrucieLeft Ancient Mariner

    Indeed, but if that's simply (as it's proposed) going to be a straight transference of EU law into UK law (with fiddling later, and not at the time of the bill itself) then who is going to oppose this? No other party has put forward any other method of maintaining a legal transition. They're only going to be voted down on these things if the parliament generally doesn't believe the government is going to implement stuff as they've stated. Admittedly, that's a trust thing, which the Tories aren't very good at. And the Repeal Bill generally will be problematic in respect to the devolved parliaments & particularly in Scotland (because of its independent legal system and the SNP's control in Edinburgh).

    But in terms of the Brexit negotiations generally, their current minority status is not going to hold them back from negotiating as they see fit.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2017
  11. Brigantium

    Brigantium Work Geordie for hire Staff Member

    I suppose there could be legal challenges in future about any decision-making by the Conservative negotiators that has implications for British law/the constitution without ever going through Parliament. Or they could make a decision and then have to get it through Parliament after agreeing it with the EU. The process is crystal clear from the EU side, but in British law, what the heck is setting out how this is supposed to work? The Conservatives can go in with whatever stance they like, but does that make any of it binding on British law?
     
  12. CriedWhenBrucieLeft

    CriedWhenBrucieLeft Ancient Mariner

    Lawyers/experts have already commented that some of the laws which, for example, specifically name-check EU institutions, can't just be "transferred" across with the passing of the Repeal Bill; they won't make sense. The contentious issue seems to be the clause the Tory Government has made (as they feel necessary, to avoid this being bogged down in parliament) to make these small amendments ("corrections") without parliamentary scrutiny; as ministers will in effect be making law themselves i.e. Henry VIII powers. I think the main issue here is people have very little trust in parliament's ability to successfully carry this out, and possibly even less trust if the government is allowed to do this on its own. I certainly don't.

    I'm quite interested in how this will effect Scotland though. There seems very little chance that the Scottish parliament won't have a legal veto on this.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2017
  13. LooseCannon

    LooseCannon Yorktown-class aircraft carrier Staff Member

    It certainly seems the courts will have to weigh in on how the process occurs, as well as the steps required.

    As Cried has noted, it seems at least the Scottish Parliament will be given a yes-no veto, and possibly the other devolved legislatures as well.
     
  14. CriedWhenBrucieLeft

    CriedWhenBrucieLeft Ancient Mariner

    What court is going to weigh-in on the process?
     
  15. Black Wizard

    Black Wizard Out of the Silent Planet

    I think the supreme court already decided that the Scottish Parliament didn't have a veto, or was that just for Article 50?
     
  16. LooseCannon

    LooseCannon Yorktown-class aircraft carrier Staff Member

    The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, the same one that ruled that Parliament had to pass the Article 50 invocation process, I would assume.

    A quick check says that the ruling was specific to invoking Article 50.
     
  17. CriedWhenBrucieLeft

    CriedWhenBrucieLeft Ancient Mariner

    We haven't heard of any further cases likely to go to court over the Brexit process though. For example, nobody has challenged the fact that no vote is required on the terms of the deal agreed. It might happen, but I can't see it happening over small details.
    That was only Article 50. We're talking (or at least I am) about the possibility that some laws may be tinkered with (by government ministers) as they are transferred into UK law from EU law. They've said this will be necessary in something like 800-1000 cases. The idea that this can happen, that a law might be technically "tweaked", but in reality subtly changed, and that this won't be subject to parliamentary scrutiny in Scotland (even if it hasn't in the UK parliament) sounds pretty unlikely. It's not that important, but obviously people are concerned that this has the potential to happen.
     
  18. CriedWhenBrucieLeft

    CriedWhenBrucieLeft Ancient Mariner

    Meanwhile: Jeremy Hunt stays as Health Secretary.

    :facepalm:
     
  19. Night Prowler

    Night Prowler ɹǝlʍoɹԀ ʇɥƃᴉN Staff Member

    She'll be the new prime-minister, Vučić just announced on TV!

    Only article in English I could find on her: https://www.rferl.org/a/serbia-gay-minister-brnabic/27912738.html

    She's not in any party so I think she's a good choice. Also, we're so progressive and tolerant now :D
     
    Brigantium likes this.
  20. The Flash

    The Flash Dennis Wilcock did 9/11

    An MP from the main opposition party CHP, who was formerly a journalist, got sent to prison for 25 years for a news report that outed illegal arms trade between Turkey and rebel groups in Syria.

    CHP has started a protest walk today, they're going to walk from Ankara to Istanbul holding a sign that says "Justice".
     

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