Blaze Bayley

SixesAlltheway

Ancient Mariner
It is shame that Blaze didnt manage to have a bigger career.

I hope that he earned enough money with Maiden for some nice life, he deserved it.

I don't want to be a downer but I don't think he earned that much money from Maiden. He received a very good salary when he was in the band and a lot more than he was used to in Wolfsbane. But you're wrong if you think he can still live off what he made in Maiden from those years.. There's a reason he's out there still playing live wherever he can and putting out albums. To make a living.
 

Vantage Point

Educated Fool
I don't want to be a downer but I don't think he earned that much money from Maiden. He received a very good salary when he was in the band and a lot more than he was used to in Wolfsbane. But you're wrong if you think he can still live off what he made in Maiden from those years.. There's a reason he's out there still playing live wherever he can and putting out albums. To make a living.

In his book it basically says he spent all the money he made with Maiden on funding the Silicon Messiah era band.

I wonder whether he still owns the publishing to the songs he wrote with Maiden? Thus will he still get an income from streams/purchases of Man on the Edge etc. Or were they included in the deal they did years ago, selling to investors. So, has he already had that money and spent it, or does he still have an income from Maiden?
 

TheTalisman

Ancient Mariner
Or were they included in the deal they did years ago, selling to investors. So, has he already had that money and spent it, or does he still have an income from Maiden?
They didn't sell their rights to their songs, it was just a bond deal - they received a lump sum upfront, while investors who bought the bond were paid the band's income from royalties from the back catalogue through coupons for a limited amount of time, I think it was like 15 years (the back catalogue was put up as a security though, if the Bond should default). Now the band should earn royalties again from the whole catalogue though, so if he didn't sell his rights, he should earn a little bit. The X Factor and Virtual XI are not streamed very much though.
 
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Vantage Point

Educated Fool
They didn't sell their rights to their songs, it was just a bond deal - they received a lump sum upfront, while investors who bought the bond were paid the band's income from royalties from the back catalogue through coupons for a limited amount of time, I think it was like 15 years (the back catalogue was put up as a security though, if the Bond should default). Now the band should earn royalties again from the whole catalogue though, so if he didn't sell his rights, he should earn a little bit. The X Factor and Virtual XI are not streamed very much though.
Oh right, well I didn't remember the details exactly, I just new there was some kind of pay out against future earnings.
 

Crazypants

Trooper
In his book it basically says he spent all the money he made with Maiden on funding the Silicon Messiah era band.

I wonder whether he still owns the publishing to the songs he wrote with Maiden? Thus will he still get an income from streams/purchases of Man on the Edge etc. Or were they included in the deal they did years ago, selling to investors. So, has he already had that money and spent it, or does he still have an income from Maiden?
I seem to remember Blaze doesn't own any publishing rights to any Maiden songs or get any money from Maiden for anything else. I want to say Maiden lump sum bought him out when they bought out his song writing credits on Brave New World shortly after firing him.

It will take me a bit to source that statement as its been awhile since Ive read up on the subject but Ill edit in sources as I find them.
 

gazda

Educated Fool
I was always wondering how band members are usually paid in bands.

They have some monthly salary as per contract for period of time? Or they get paid in full after tour?

Rob got 1 mil. $ when he joined Metallica, Blaze said when he joined Maiden he finally brought his dreamcar, I think Jaguar.
 

Dityn DJ James

A coma stole my name.
I was always wondering how band members are usually paid in bands.

They have some monthly salary as per contract for period of time? Or they get paid in full after tour?

Rob got 1 mil. $ when he joined Metallica, Blaze said when he joined Maiden he finally brought his dreamcar, I think Jaguar.
That's a really good question
 

Zare

Uniformly distributed hostility
Rob got 1 mil. $ when he joined Metallica, Blaze said when he joined Maiden he finally brought his dreamcar, I think Jaguar.

They need to do this for the band cohesion. Or else Blaze wouldn't probably have enough $ to pay a round for everyone at the bar let alone anything else. When I had work assignments abroad my basic stuff is paid and I had an allowance. However the way you live there somewhere, depends on how much of your own money are you able to spend.

You want your new member to fit in asap. That requires going to same places that these millionaires go. A kickstart is necessary.

However, the band will see that kickstart as an investment. Blaze also had credits on his first Maiden album which is the first such instance. Together with the exit package where he sold rights to material that ended up on BNW, it does feel generous. He received an incentive, chance to songwrite and earn not only from all "his" albums but from one extra too. FWIW, Blaze's strong side, the creativity, was repaid well.
 

Randalf

Ancient Mariner
Blaze has often expressed that during the Wolfsbane days, the collaboration with Rick Rubin wasn't the most enjoyable one. He's been rather vocal about whenever it's been brought up, but nonetheless a bit more diplomatic nowadays than in 1995, like when interviewed by Finnish music magazine "Soundi". So, for the sake of a random interview anecdote, have a rough translation:

- Wolfsbane would have deserved more appreciation than the share it got, but what can you do when squeezed by the pressure from all these record companies
--
- Rubin acted like a spoiled brat, which he in reality is. Being a brat of rich parents Rubin has never had to do any work in all of his life and it shows. For him, Wolfsbane was just another toy among many others and when our collaboration wasn't immediately successful we were forgotten and buried somewhere deep in the archives to wait for our record deal to expire.
 

koponto

Invader
Huge fan of the ''The Man Who Would Not Die'' and ''Promise & Terror'' albums. Heavier than any other albums Blaze has put out - the Bermudez brothers had a death metal background, and it shows on the riffs. I think the heavier direction really suited Blaze's vocals as well.

My personal favourite solo stuff from Blaze are the last 4 songs on Promise & Terror (Surrounded by Sadness, The Trace of Things That Have No Words, Letting Go of the World, Comfortable in Darkness), which all work well on their own but together form one piece of music, with lyrics about falling into depression after his wife's death and eventually overcoming/accepting his own darkness.

While I dig the trilogy and the new album as well, I personally feel this was ''the'' lineup for Blaze, and was super gutted when the band fell apart. The albums they put out are IMO underrated too, as people seem to only know the first two (and the newer) releases.
Was thrilled to see a couple tracks from them on the recent set list, maybe with the addition of Luke Appleton in the band we could see some more of these songs played live, as they couldn't be played properly with a one-guitar lineup.
 

____no5

The Angel Of The Odd
Together with the exit package where he sold rights to material that ended up on BNW, it does feel generous.

I saw someone else mentioning that, specifically Dream of Mirrors. Do we have evidence for that? And also, were there other songs that Blaze contributed in BNW? (Mercenary feels like one)
 
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koponto

Invader
Dream of Mirrors, Blood Brothers, Mercenary, Nomad were the 4 songs lying around while Blaze was still in the band. Not sure which one(s) he contributed to, though.
 

Boroking

I talk to planets…
Huge fan of the ''The Man Who Would Not Die'' and ''Promise & Terror'' albums. Heavier than any other albums Blaze has put out - the Bermudez brothers had a death metal background, and it shows on the riffs. I think the heavier direction really suited Blaze's vocals as well.

My personal favourite solo stuff from Blaze are the last 4 songs on Promise & Terror (Surrounded by Sadness, The Trace of Things That Have No Words, Letting Go of the World, Comfortable in Darkness), which all work well on their own but together form one piece of music, with lyrics about falling into depression after his wife's death and eventually overcoming/accepting his own darkness.

While I dig the trilogy and the new album as well, I personally feel this was ''the'' lineup for Blaze, and was super gutted when the band fell apart. The albums they put out are IMO underrated too, as people seem to only know the first two (and the newer) releases.
Was thrilled to see a couple tracks from them on the recent set list, maybe with the addition of Luke Appleton in the band we could see some more of these songs played live, as they couldn't be played properly with a one-guitar lineup.

I would love to hear 'Time to Dare' from Promise and Terror. I feel its underrated as i rarely hear it mentioned but it's riffing, solos and lyrics are all :notworthy: and Blazes delivery is on point. As far as i can tell it's never been played live.
 

srfc

Ancient Mariner
Promise and Terror is pretty decent, the only one since the first two that I've occasionally went back to. Tried Blood and Belief in the last year or so, wasn't a fan when it came out and think it's dated badly now as well.
 

Boroking

I talk to planets…
Tried Blood and Belief in the last year or so, wasn't a fan when it came out and think it's dated badly now as well.

I didn't like Blood and Belief at all when i first bought it (except Life and Death) and i was drifting away from metal towards psych back then so it just sat on the shelf for years. But i went back to it last year and i think it's a really strong record. 2 dud tracks (Hollow Head and the path and the way) but everything else is great, with a bit more groove then the other records. The lyrics chimed with me more also as i'm now older, jaded and brow-beaten which i sometimes feel is an important prerequisite for Blazes music.
 

koponto

Invader
Blood and Belief is full of amazing songs, too- Regret, Tearing Yourself to Pieces and Soundtrack of My Life being my favourites.
The only thing I find lacking is the production, but that's true for other albums of his as well.
Overall I really like Blaze's lyrics much better when they're dealing with ''real'' stuff, as opposed to science fiction stories.

Here's a super underrated song from the TMWWND-era band, bonus track from the DVD.


Time to Dare is awesome, too!
 
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Boroking

I talk to planets…
Blood and Belief is full of amazing songs, too- Regret, Tearing Yourself to Pieces and Soundtrack of My Life being my favourites.
The only thing I find lacking is the production, but that's true for other albums of his as well.
Overall I really like Blaze's lyrics much better when they're dealing with ''real'' stuff, as opposed to science fiction stories.

Here's a super underrated song from the TMWND-era band, bonus track from the DVD.


Time to Dare is awesome, too!
Somehow that track has slipped past me. Really good, nice hearing the BBB let rip again. Lawrence Paterson was a monster drummer.
 
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