Carcass

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
All long ago. The tribal was not a huge new thing for a Maiden. Although they never did it in such a large chunk of one song. But if it was big surprise than it was about the only of the last few years.
 
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karljant

Ancient Mariner
The tribal was not a huge new thing for a Maiden. Although they never did it in such a large chunk of one song. But if it was big surprise than it was about the only of the last few years.
Empire of The Clouds: Maiden doing a rock opera with a large piano intro.
Satellite 15: Long as hell intro filled with electronic effects in a futuristic ambiance.
Brighter Than A Thousand Suns: Never did I heard Maiden doing such intricate patterns when it comes to time signatures... plus the desolate eerie ambiance is quite unique.
Face In The Sand: Full orchestral epic with double kick all the way.
Blood Brothers: Celtic influenced theme with a waltz time signature.

... and bear in mind that Maiden is one of the bands that sticks more to their formula. Yet even them manage to pour some stuff they never tried before in every single album.
All long ago.
Some of the bands/ artists I mentioned have careers nearly 30 years long (some already been 40 years in the business) and you still can't figure out where they're going to pull out next: Devin Townsend, Ihsahn, Opeth, Enslaved, Sepultura, Ulver, The Cure, Peter Murphy or Depeche Mode (and how could I forget acts like Killing Joke, Pyogenesis, Cynic, Faith No More, Witt and Nine Inch Nails? To this day you never know what to expect from each release).

Don´t forget AC/DC and Motörhead.
Regarding bands that hardly change there are many more... like The Ramones, ZZ Top, etc. But the point is not proving that there are bands that stick religiously to a formula. It's precisely the opposite: debunking the myth that if you're x years deep in youre career you simply aren't able to bring something new to the table. And I think I pointed some good examples.
 
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karljant

Ancient Mariner
I think it's a bit demanding to hope for it every time.
Indeed... and also do I (although some artists manage to pull it out almost every single release - if not every damned one). But since Carcass returned there's not a single glimpse of novelty in their sound which happened to be one of their major attributes from album to album.
 

Diesel 11

As you scream into the web of silence...
Karljant’s point I think is mostly that Carcass was a band that was constantly evolving back in their first stint. Every album was unlike the last. Reek of Putrefaction was short and sweet goregrind pieces; Symphonies of Sickness worked with longer song structures; Necroticism was death metal with progressive leanings; Heartwork was tight melodeath; Swansong was death ‘n’ roll; and Barbed Wire Soul was heavy rock. Once they rebranded, they mostly stuck in a mix of Necroticism and Heartwork. Kinda just leaning into them being the ‘pathological death metal band’ image.

And there’s nothing wrong with that at all. If anything they might be more consistent now by sticking to their comfort zone. But for the band that radically shifted with each new album, and in shifting drastically altered the scene of extreme metal — the fact that they’re only sticking to their comfort zone now feels slightly off. It’s not a bad thing, but it does mean we lose the surprise factor so integral to the Carcass of yore.
 

karljant

Ancient Mariner
Karljant’s point I think is mostly that Carcass was a band that was constantly evolving back in their first stint. Every album was unlike the last. Reek of Putrefaction was short and sweet goregrind pieces; Symphonies of Sickness worked with longer song structures; Necroticism was death metal with progressive leanings; Heartwork was tight melodeath; Swansong was death ‘n’ roll; and Barbed Wire Soul was heavy rock. Once they rebranded, they mostly stuck in a mix of Necroticism and Heartwork. Kinda just leaning into them being the ‘pathological death metal band’ image.

And there’s nothing wrong with that at all. If anything they might be more consistent now by sticking to their comfort zone. But for the band that radically shifted with each new album, and in shifting drastically altered the scene of extreme metal — the fact that they’re only sticking to their comfort zone now feels slightly off. It’s not a bad thing, but it does mean we lose the surprise factor so integral to the Carcass of yore.
That was exactly my point well summed. But if you read my review with attention the last paragraph says that although I think Carcass ceasing to shape shift is kind of a bummer for me personally, if the band and majority of fans prefers it that way hey! good for them and they're 100% entitled to it. Yes, I preferred some innovation but in its absence by no means I think Torn Arteries is a weak or even meh/filler album. If so I'd never give it 7.5 points out of 10.
 

Forostar

Ancient Mariner
I got his point and it did not contradict mine. The one but last album had the same thing as the current, karljant said. So the surprising thing ceased long ago (the 2nd but last album). 25 years.
 

Diesel 11

As you scream into the web of silence...
Well they were also disbanded from 1996-2007, and it took till 2013 for Surgical Steel to come out, so really it’s only been eight years since the surprise factor was removed.
 

frus

Barbed Wire Hen
I've been listening to a lot of Celtic Frost in the last few days for some reason, and today I remembered I could listen to the new Carcass album.
The first thing I heard was "UGH"
I was confused for a few seconds, went to check what's spinning....
 

Diesel 11

As you scream into the web of silence...
I bought Torn Arteries on vinyl last year, but never got around to spinning it till now. At first I was really impressed by how different it felt to normal Carcass and the lack of Jeff’s vocals on the first track — and then I realized that for some reason the vinyl is played at 45 instead of the standard 33. Oh well.

Even setting it to the correct speed, I was still impressed! This is a Carcass that is surely having fun with the music, staying in their comfort zone BUT still pushing themselves within said zone. It’s a very satisfying record because they know what they want to do and how they want to do it. I really like it, I think it’ll only get better with time. A classic Carcass album that still feels fresh.
 
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