Unpopular Maiden Opinions

MrKnickerbocker

clap hands
It's one of those riffs that's so simple in composition that, although Adrian has almost certainly heard the track before, he probably never had any clue he was channeling it while writing Wicker Man.

Not saying that excuses it, but it's an every day occurrence in songwriting (especially with such a simplistic chord progression).
 

chaosapiant

Ancient Marinade
If two artists make a very similar piece of art, independently and without knowledge of the other and at different times, did one copy the other? I don’t believe so. So the question in regards to Maiden’s “plagiarism” is did they do it knowingly? And that’s hard to prove. So I ignore it.
 

Collin

New Tool is coming!
It's one of those riffs that's so simple in composition that, although Adrian has almost certainly heard the track before, he probably never had any clue he was channeling it while writing Wicker Man.

Not saying that excuses it, but it's an every day occurrence in songwriting (especially with such a simplistic chord progression).
This ^
 

Mosh

The years just pass like trains
Staff member
They are pretty simple and uncreative riffs. Both bands turned them into really good songs though.
 

Zare

Automaton Sovietico
There are two similarities. Groove and key. Key is the most popular tuning's root
I mean anybody who plays guitar could tell you that it's pretty much the same thing.
But it ain't. Groove and root are the same which is hardly unexpected for metal. The E powerchord part is different and slightly more complex in Wicker Man. First, it starts with open muted 6th string. Regardless of that, the powerchord is never played complete as the accents alter between fifth-octave interval and root note. The interval is played with heavy vibrato, as are C and G. The vibrato is so important that you basically must do C and G on the A string position because due to different tension in different parts of the fretboard you aren't going to get the vibrato in other case.

If you use same techniques (or nuances) to play Wicker Man as you would with Running Wild it is not going to be Wicker Man riff.

There is a top notch example of importants of nuance - Walk by Pantera. There was a shit ton of riffs in metal that had same groove and same notes but they aren't played "in the same way". As vibrato and the accents make up the Wicker Man riff the bend makes the Walk riff. Very simple.
 

srfc

Ancient Mariner
Just to add a thought here, it's possible that the Maiden boys don't actually know the Priest song and it's neither a rip-off or a tribute at all. We sometimes assume too much that the artists we listen to are as familiar with each other as we are.
I think it's a very reasonable assumption given that Priest were one of the few metal bands on the scene when the members of Maiden were in their formative years. At the very least Paul Di'Anno was probably aware of it as he name drops "Delivering the Goods" on the version of Wrathchild from Metal for Muthas, and that was a track from the same album as Running Wild.
 

karljant

Ancient Mariner
There is a top notch example of importants of nuance - Walk by Pantera
Fact. So many bands that "borrowed" that riff. Although my conclusion is the opposite. They're simple nuances. But it's all relative with the degree of originality one demands regarding music. For me it's not enough adding 2 notes, or a pull, an harmonic or minor adornements. For others it suffices. Regarding wether it's plagiarism or not I really don't care. What bugs me is everytime TWM kicks in I feel the urge to go "RIGHT!" like Halford in Unleashed In The East.
 
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karljant

Ancient Mariner
It's more likely that the riff during the verses in Futureal inspired Adrian, lol.

People doesn't notice the similarity with the riff in Futureal that much though, because of the vocals.
I get your point and undoubtly the riff is there (once again). But the reason why I don't see Futureal as a blatant copy is not so much because of the vocal overlay. In this case 2 more notes are added to the verse part (like in the TWM) but it also features the main guitar lick, which is easily what stands out during this section while the rest remains accessory. On the other hand TWM's riff dynamic is heavily built upon that very part. Other reason is that the song doesn't kick in with that riff (both Running wild and TWM do, underlining even more the akward resemblance). Finally There's a difference between similitude in 75% and 50% of a section (bearing in mind that in the case of the most similar one - TWM - the verse only features 4 different notes). So here's a curious case that doesn't sound that alarming to me although featuring the very same riff. But in all honesty one must admit: it's also there.
 
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