Senjutsu - 3rd September 2021

Azas

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night
Google translate
Senjutsu:
This first track begins with a tribal rhythm enhanced by aggressive guitars, all on an epic mid-tempo and in a rather heavy atmosphere compared to what we have heard before from the band. A feeling of melancholy emerges from certain passages, with superb vocals harmonized in a rather unconventional way from Bruce Dickinson. In this, it is already a novelty on this disc. With music by Adrian Smith, the subject of '' Senjutsu '' developed by Steve Harris evokes a Nordic people having to protect a wall at the risk of their life. Dave Murray splits up a very inspired solo and Adrian Smith takes on part of the one you hear at the end, dubbed by synths. Certain passages evoke what Bruce could sometimes do on titles of his solo career, a major contribution for this new discographic delivery.
Lost in a Lost World:
Unheard of (rather heard) in an intro by MAIDEN which spans nearly 2 minutes and which is meant to be melancholy. Note the effects on Bruce's voice, followed by soaring choirs lined with synth pads. When the song really starts, certain atmospheres evoke those of "No More Lies" ("Dance Of Death" in 2003). Bruce doubles some of his lines in new ways and with amazing power. Many changes of rhythm take place over the passing minutes with a long instrumental part. Here we are in the presence of a composition in the purest Harris vein, which does not avoid certain pitfalls such as the redundancy of parts not necessarily essential to the success of a title.
Days of Future Past:
The Smith / Dickinson duo rose like a Swiss cuckoo clock with this title in the vein of '' The Mercenary '', '' The Wicker Man '' or '' Speed Of Light '' for the aggressive side of the riff. At this point in listening, it should be noted that Adrian Smith, who co-wrote the track with Bruce Dickinson, is taking the lion's share. The lyrics are once again quite dark (“Waiting for the judgment and the judgment never ends”).
The Time Machine:
Co-written by Gers and Harris, the opening melody is a direct sequel to '' The Legacy '' on "A Matter Of Life And Death" in 2006, a title already co-written by the same tandem before the keyboards do not interfere for a more airy style. Then, although there are at the same time common places which reassure the listener, it is completely new for MAIDEN. In the development, the pre-chorus, the phrasing of the song especially with this particular break which arrives after 3 minutes. The sound that we hear during Dave Murray's solo is also to be classified in the box of the novelties and we also note that the distribution of the guitars in the mix has been modified a little, giving each of the guitarists more amplitude. on the final rendering.
 

Azas

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night
Darkest Hour:
Third effort of the Smith / Dickinson team (neither of them signs solo titles on the disc), we start with the sound of the waves and the cry of the seagulls. '' Rime Of The Ancient Mariner 2 ''? No ! The intro is almost neoclassical with this superb Smith melody. The song is rather slow on the whole and the lyrics are dark (“We bury our sons…”). Bruce's song is more distant in the mix and wants to be more conventional even if it arises on chord sequences that the group has never used to date with blues rock consonances specific to the universe that loves Adrian Smith so much. The solo double is magical with a Murray who remakes us the '' Coming Home '' move in 2010, Hendrixian in spirit.
Death of the Celts:
Harris is at home here, making his mark in land he knows all too well. "The Clansman" immediately springs to mind with this intro on bass and acoustic guitar before the electrics go off after 2 minutes. Perhaps the piece that comes closest to a so-called classical bill, a good title however with a large instrumental part (too much perhaps in the group which would sometimes benefit from pruning a little more, which would make it more efficient. ). Gers provides a first solo followed by Murray and finally Smith. The latter is very aggressive within seconds and it is a surprise as effective as it is intense. The voices are quite stripped down, without any particular effects or line doubling. The loop is complete at the end of the 10 minutes that this song lasts with an end identical to that of the beginning.
The Parchment:
Ravel's Bolero! Here's what comes to mind from the intro. Modern classic "metallic" and again, a new atmosphere for MAIDEN. Whatever happens next on this song, we are completely committed to its cause. And what happens next is incredibly heavy! Slow rhythm, almost doomsque in spirit, with oriental accents: it is simply hypnotizing and at high volume, the song sends us to another dimension. Bruce's voice (who throughout the album demonstrates his mastery by atomizing the spectrum allotted to him) is doubled by a guitar, while the subject deals with a mystical parchment. We observe a large suite of Gers / Smith / Murray solos before the return of the vocals dubbed by Murray's guitar and everything takes off in the traditional way after 10 minutes. It’s almost a shame compared to the power and originality of the treatment at the start, but all this is quickly overtaken by a double of solos, Gers first and Smith then. An original ending, subsequently used, which takes up the musical motif of the introduction. MAGISTRAL!
Hell on Earth:
Last track from an album that commands respect from the first minute and fourth block signed Harris. '' Hell On Earth '' begins with a long introduction with keyboard layers, bass arpeggios and a guitar melody that is grafted on top of it. The real beginning of the song surprises a bit because it arrives without warning, a gallop stamped 100% MAIDEN and a line of vocals that starts with a guitar that follows the melody and recalls '' When The Wild Wind Blows '' ("The Final Frontier ”of 2010). The song has airs of already-heard in the group's discography, but it is no less effective. Stage chorus in mode we jump into the pit with our fists raised and one last time, the solo part takes up space in a record that gives them pride of place anyway. The finale is on the same pattern as on '' The Parchment '', heavy as lead with a last solo. Dark in the whole of the lyrics written for "Senjutsu", this last title deals with the miserable state of the planet where we find the theme of armed children fighting in the name of a God.
 

Kalata

Out of the Silent Planet
Senjutsu:
Dave Murray splits up a very inspired solo and Adrian Smith takes on part of the one you hear at the end, dubbed by synths.
So no solo from Janick in the title track? Like for ''The Final Frontier''.

Btw, Adrian is also without a solo in ''Brave New World''.
 

Kalata

Out of the Silent Planet
Lost in a Lost World:
Unheard of (rather heard) in an intro by MAIDEN which spans nearly 2 minutes and which is meant to be melancholy. Note the effects on Bruce's voice, followed by soaring choirs lined with synth pads. When the song really starts, certain atmospheres evoke those of "No More Lies" ("Dance Of Death" in 2003). Bruce doubles some of his lines in new ways and with amazing power. Many changes of rhythm take place over the passing minutes with a long instrumental part. Here we are in the presence of a composition in the purest Harris vein, which does not avoid certain pitfalls such as the redundancy of parts not necessarily essential to the success of a title.
Melancholy intro, effects on Bruce's voice (really curious), soaring choirs, synths (I love that the album will have a lot of use of synths), atmosphere like in ''No More Lies'', double vocals (again), many changes of the rhythm, long instrumental part - I can already tell that I will like this song.
Days of Future Past:
The Smith / Dickinson duo rose like a Swiss cuckoo clock with this title in the vein of '' The Mercenary '', '' The Wicker Man '' or '' Speed Of Light '' for the aggressive side of the riff. At this point in listening, it should be noted that Adrian Smith, who co-wrote the track with Bruce Dickinson, is taking the lion's share. The lyrics are once again quite dark (“Waiting for the judgment and the judgment never ends”).
Aggressive riff (great) and Adrian's taking the lion's share - I expect ''The Wicker Man'' Pt. 2
The Time Machine:
Co-written by Gers and Harris, the opening melody is a direct sequel to '' The Legacy '' on "A Matter Of Life And Death" in 2006, a title already co-written by the same tandem before the keyboards do not interfere for a more airy style. Then, although there are at the same time common places which reassure the listener, it is completely new for MAIDEN. In the development, the pre-chorus, the phrasing of the song especially with this particular break which arrives after 3 minutes. The sound that we hear during Dave Murray's solo is also to be classified in the box of the novelties and we also note that the distribution of the guitars in the mix has been modified a little, giving each of the guitarists more amplitude. on the final rendering.
Acoustic intro, keyboards - all familiar. The pre-chorus, the phrasing, break after 3 minutes - completely NEW for Maiden... this song became even more curious. Dave's solo is a novelty... can't wait to hear it.
Darkest Hour:
Third effort of the Smith / Dickinson team (neither of them signs solo titles on the disc), we start with the sound of the waves and the cry of the seagulls. '' Rime Of The Ancient Mariner 2 ''? No ! The intro is almost neoclassical with this superb Smith melody. The song is rather slow on the whole and the lyrics are dark (“We bury our sons…”). Bruce's song is more distant in the mix and wants to be more conventional even if it arises on chord sequences that the group has never used to date with blues rock consonances specific to the universe that loves Adrian Smith so much. The solo double is magical with a Murray who remakes us the '' Coming Home '' move in 2010, Hendrixian in spirit.
The intro will sound epic, methinks (neoclassical... wow!). Superb Smith melody (like always). Double solo - I knew this song will have only two solos. I just hope those blues rock consonances to be good.
Death of the Celts:
Harris is at home here, making his mark in land he knows all too well. "The Clansman" immediately springs to mind with this intro on bass and acoustic guitar before the electrics go off after 2 minutes. Perhaps the piece that comes closest to a so-called classical bill, a good title however with a large instrumental part (too much perhaps in the group which would sometimes benefit from pruning a little more, which would make it more efficient. ). Gers provides a first solo followed by Murray and finally Smith. The latter is very aggressive within seconds and it is a surprise as effective as it is intense. The voices are quite stripped down, without any particular effects or line doubling. The loop is complete at the end of the 10 minutes that this song lasts with an end identical to that of the beginning.
Bass intro, large instrumental part - yes! Three solos (brutal solo from Adrian it seems)! The end of the song is expected. As Kevin Shirley said, this song is pure Maiden!
The Parchment:
Ravel's Bolero! Here's what comes to mind from the intro. Modern classic "metallic" and again, a new atmosphere for MAIDEN. Whatever happens next on this song, we are completely committed to its cause. And what happens next is incredibly heavy! Slow rhythm, almost doomsque in spirit, with oriental accents: it is simply hypnotizing and at high volume, the song sends us to another dimension. Bruce's voice (who throughout the album demonstrates his mastery by atomizing the spectrum allotted to him) is doubled by a guitar, while the subject deals with a mystical parchment. We observe a large suite of Gers / Smith / Murray solos before the return of the vocals dubbed by Murray's guitar and everything takes off in the traditional way after 10 minutes. It’s almost a shame compared to the power and originality of the treatment at the start, but all this is quickly overtaken by a double of solos, Gers first and Smith then. An original ending, subsequently used, which takes up the musical motif of the introduction. MAGISTRAL!
New atmosphere for Maiden. Heavy song with oriental accents. Bruce's voice is double by guitar (by Dave it seems). This song will have 5 solos! (like ''Mother Russia'' and ''The Thin Line Between Love And Hate'').
Hell on Earth:
Last track from an album that commands respect from the first minute and fourth block signed Harris. '' Hell On Earth '' begins with a long introduction with keyboard layers, bass arpeggios and a guitar melody that is grafted on top of it. The real beginning of the song surprises a bit because it arrives without warning, a gallop stamped 100% MAIDEN and a line of vocals that starts with a guitar that follows the melody and recalls '' When The Wild Wind Blows '' ("The Final Frontier ”of 2010). The song has airs of already-heard in the group's discography, but it is no less effective. Stage chorus in mode we jump into the pit with our fists raised and one last time, the solo part takes up space in a record that gives them pride of place anyway. The finale is on the same pattern as on '' The Parchment '', heavy as lead with a last solo. Dark in the whole of the lyrics written for "Senjutsu", this last title deals with the miserable state of the planet where we find the theme of armed children fighting in the name of a God.
Keyboard layers, bass arpeggios, gallop (great), guitar melody follows the vocals (again), stage chorus! How many solos will this song have - 4?
 

Vaenyr

Ancient Mariner
New atmosphere for Maiden. Heavy song with oriental accents. Bruce's voice is double by guitar (by Dave it seems). This song will have 5 solos! (like ''Mother Russia'' and ''The Thin Line Between Love And Hate'').
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think this will be the first song of their career with that many solos, where instead of being played by one or at most two of the guitarists, all three of them share the solos.

Usually in a song with more than three solos you have one guitarist playing all, or most of them, like Dave on TTLBLAH, or Adrian on Starblind.
 
Last edited:

Kalata

Out of the Silent Planet
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think this will be the first song of their career with that many solos, where instead of being played by one or at most two of the guitarists, all three of them share the solos.

Usually in a song with more than three solos you have one guitarist playing all, or most of them, like Dave on TTLBLAH, or Adrian on Starblind.
Yep - 2 Adrian solos, 2 Janick solos and 1 Dave solo for ''The Parchment''. Can't wait to hear it.

As for the latter part of your comment - for example, in TRATB the solos are 2 from Adrian and 1 from Janick & Dave.
 
Top