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The (Archeological) Discoveries Topic

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Forostar, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. Perun

    Perun Climbing like a monkey Staff Member

    There were in fact many Germanic tribes living west of the Rhine. The name Germani cisrhenani I mentioned earlier even suggests that this particular tribe lived west of the Rhine. The definition of everything west of the Rhine being Gaul and everything east of it being Germania was an artificial piece of convenience of Caesar's.
    The most prominent Germanic tribe living west of the Rhine were the Treverii, who gave the name to Augusta Treveorum, modern-day Trier, in late antiquity one of the capitals of the Roman Empire.

    And actually, there were a good number of Germanic tribes living on the other side (i.e. 'Gaulic') of the Rhine in the modern-day Netherlands in Caesar's time, the Menapi, Eburones, Aduatuci and Nervi being the most prominent ones.

    However, I want to make one thing clear. We are talking about the Germanic tribes, not the Germans. That is a profound difference.
     
    Brigantium likes this.
  2. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    Funny, since I live south of the Rhine (which runs in my country from east to west) I always talk about north and south of the Rhine.

    :)

    [​IMG]

    But in your view, Per, I live (also) west of it. :)
     
  3. Perun

    Perun Climbing like a monkey Staff Member

    Edited the above post, you won't like it ;)
     
  4. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    What part exactly? :)
     
  5. Perun

    Perun Climbing like a monkey Staff Member

     
  6. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    There's nothing annoying about that hehe. Almost everyone on this forum speaks a Germanic language as well. :)

    Oh, and don't forget the Batavians mate.
     
  7. Perun

    Perun Climbing like a monkey Staff Member

    Forgot about them, indeed!
     
  8. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

  9. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

  10. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    Discovery of a massive underwater volcano off Indonesia's western coast

    The 15,000-foot- (4,600-meter-) high mountain spans 30 miles (50 kilometers) at its base, Yusuf Surachman Djajadihardja, a marine geologist with the government's Agency for Assessment and Application Technology, said Friday. Its discovery was "completely unexpected," he said.

    It was not immediately clear if the volcano is active, but he said if it were and it erupted, it would be "very, very dangerous."
      ...more..
     
  11. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    This is more of an invention but a very, very funny (and stupid) one. In fact we're talking about a true thousand_suns invention:

    Colombian student invents bicycle that already existed

    [​IMG]

    Noticias Caracol anchor Mabel Lara was "very surprised" by the "very creative" Colombian invention of a bicycle that can be folded in two. What the inventor didn't tell the national news team is that the bike was invented in the 1960's. Ouch!

    "With pride," Caracol announced David Andres Cañon, a student at Bogota's National University, managed to evade the question like a politician about where he got the idea from and proceeded to explain how a folding bicycle works.

    "This way it doesn't take up as much space and you can keep it in where ever," the Caracol anchor noted intelligently, not realizing that millions of people around the world already found that out decades ago.

    Cañon went on saying that he alone invented the bicycle over a period of two years and announced the bicycle was in production and will be officially presented to the public in Medellin on July 24. "A marvelous idea," the ever-so-gorgeous Lara noted.

    For those who can not wait and want to know all about this authentic Colombian invention, here's some photos of similar or exactly the same invention, but from yeeeeaaaaars ago.

    Example 1 (from the 1960's)
    Example 2 (exactly the same bicycle, but Dutch, second-hand version)
    Example 3 (similar bike, but prettier)
     
  12. LooseCannon

    LooseCannon Yorktown-class aircraft carrier Staff Member

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staffordshire_hoard

    This discovery of a huge Anglo-Saxon hoard of precious artifacts is just astounding.  Details will be forthcoming on this for the next 15 years, and it is very likely to help us write a lot of blanks in the Heptarchy Era.
     
  13. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    Very interesting, thanks for the update! I am still before that era in my book about The Isles so now I am even more eager to read about the Kingdom of Mercia.
     
  14. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    A few days ago, the wreck of the flagship "De Walcheren" has been found and is now being investigated by divers and the Dutch navy. De Walcheren took part in all the major battles against the English in the Second Dutch-Anglo war, the Chatham Raid and in the invasion of England in 1688, under Admiral Cornelis Evertsen. In 1689 the ship sunk near the harbour of Vlissingen.

    [​IMG]
    The "Walcheren", 155 foot long, 40 feet wide, capacity of 380 men en 70 canons.

    It also took part in:

    The Four Days Battle (June 1966)
    St. James's Day Battle (July 1666)
    The Battle of Solebay (June 1672)
    The Battle of Kijkduin (August 1673)

    [​IMG]
    The Burning of the Royal James at the "Battle of Solebay", 7 June 1672 by Willem van de Velde the younger. De Ruyter's flagship De Zeven Provinciën is shown in the left background in close combat with the Vice-Admiral of the Blue, Sir Joseph Jordan on Royal Sovereign. The ship to the right of the burning Royal James is that of Vice-Admiral Johan de Liefde.
     
  15. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    This I find really cool. A cannon from a ship that sank more than 200 years ago, was actually loaded and could easily have gone off, when recovered by archeologists! Of course I do not find it cool if it had gone off and killed people, but I am amazed that something old as that (and having been under water) still works as if we're in the 18th century! I call that "mental time traveling", and I wonder how strange the fear must have felt.
    http://edition.cnn.com/2013/01/13/us/new-york-loaded-antique-cannon/index.html?hpt=us_c2
     
  16. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    Wow:
    8,000 artefacts and rising: City dig pronounced the 'most important ever' in London

    Archaeologists have nicknamed the site 'the Pompeii of the North'

    When archaeologists were called to a site in the City of London where an ugly office block and a bar once stood, they were sceptical that it held any secrets.

    Yet six months into the dig on Bloomberg Place, a three-acre site close to Mansion House tube station, experts believed they have stumbled across the most important find of Roman London artefacts in recent memory and have dubbed it the “Pompeii of the north”.

    Sophie Jackson, from the Museum of London Archaeology (Mola), is managing the site. She said: “We have a huge amount of stuff from the first four hundred years of London. It will tell us so much about the people of London. We will get names and addresses, things we’ve never had before. It’s really exciting.”

    Archaeologists have so far discovered 8,000 objects and expect that to rise to 10,000 by the time the project is finished. These include writing tablets, clothing, jewellery and pottery as well as parts of buildings that will help build a picture of thriving London life from around 40 AD to the fifth century.

    Ms Jackson said: “Why the site is so incredibly important is the preservation of archaeological finds which are normally decayed, or lost or destroyed on other sites.” The reason many of the objects are so well preserved is that one of London’s lost rivers, the Walbrook River, ran under the site, with the damp conditions preserving the objects.

    Michael Marshall, Roman find specialist at Mola, said the findings would “completely transform” understanding of Roman London. “There are very few civilian sites. This is the largest assemblage discovered in London.” ... more
     
  17. Brigantium

    Brigantium Work Geordie for hire Staff Member

    Nice! They found a plague pit in London recently while constructing a rail link, but this looks spectacular
     
  18. LooseCannon

    LooseCannon Yorktown-class aircraft carrier Staff Member

    I'd love to visit Londinium.
     
  19. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

  20. Brigantium

    Brigantium Work Geordie for hire Staff Member

    Great find, in such good condition, too. There are some brilliant finds in your part of the world. My recorder is copied from a near-intact medieval instrument found under a house in Dordrecht.
     

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