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NOW READING

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Anonymous, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    Representative for his other works, or better: all his works, in which fantasy is not the prime genre. The fantasy (locations/language Tolkien influences etc) aspects are different from most other works, I assume. Isn't the bulk of his work more earth related? My brother (who has read a lot of fantasy) was really into The Tower, and not that much into Stephen King in general.
     
  2. Ariana

    Ariana Purple leopard

    Well, yeah. This is a sweeping generalisation but in a nutshell - yes, it's true.
     
  3. Forostar

    Forostar Conjure the Death Star again

    Always good to have the view of a King expert on this. :)
     
  4. JudasMyGuide

    JudasMyGuide Domini canis

    Funny that you mention it, but there was a time when I returned to his books almost exclusively because of his personal and biographical digressions and allusions. It probably isn't surprising then I was completely crazy about It, The Shining, Hearts in Atlantis, The Body (I still think Seasons are brought down a bit by both Pupil and Method, but maybe that's just me), Tommyknockers and most of all, On Writing. I even realised I keep re-reading the forewords and afterwords (especially to the short story collections), where he was usually very personal. I guess I really should read Tower then. Problem is, Gunslinger is a molasses-slow introduction (just like the first season of The Wire :D ) and considering I am already midway through a massive series (Dune) and a friend of mine (well, a preacher, actually, but somewhat of a friend too) keeps bugging me that I should read Malazan Book of the Fallen and I would also like to read Witcher before I'll play the game, I just have a hard time starting with it.
     
  5. Ariana

    Ariana Purple leopard

    Add Dostoevsky's The Idiot to the list of musts, while you're at it. :p
     
    JudasMyGuide likes this.
  6. JudasMyGuide

    JudasMyGuide Domini canis

    Yeah, that preacher-friend also keeps forcing me into Dostoevsky in general. Karamazovs are absolutely awesome, one of the best books I've ever read, so I have his works on my list anyway. However, I'd also like to read complete Tolstoy (and I already have his books in my library, so that's easier), because I'm interested in the "heretic" :D
     
  7. The Flash

    The Flash Dennis Wilcock did 9/11

    Once I finish my finals, I plan on going on a Dostoyevsky reading spree myself.
     
  8. Cornfed Hick

    Cornfed Hick Electric Eye

    How DARE you!! :p The first season is completely awesome.

    I significantly prefer Tolstoy. Loved War & Peace and Anna Karenina, couldn't stand Brothers Karamazov (pretentious, characters are caricatures, not natural people).
     
  9. JudasMyGuide

    JudasMyGuide Domini canis

    Finished St. Augustine's Confessions. Although I have some disageements with the bloke (his concept of grace is completely Helvetic and I have a hard time accepting that, for example), it was a blast and despite the last few books being quite hard to get into, I'd say it is an extraordinary work by itself. Yep, some of his thoughts and ideas are dated nowadays (in fact, some were rendered obsolete already by Aquinas, but who cares), but the autobiographical part is very captivating, heartfelt and it really moved me. It would seem we two are not that different in the end.

    Currently continuing that line of reading by re-visiting Nikos Kazantzakis's God's Pauper: Saint Francis of Assisi, as Kazantzakis is one of the authors I usually gladly return to. Also reading Chapterhouse: Dune and I really hope I'll finish the Karamazovs soon. My Tolkien reading has slowed down significantly, but I really hope I'll improve that soon.

    Also, I'm really looking forward to reading Jesus of Nazareth by Roman Brandstaetter (I asked for the rather new Czech translation for my birthday). From what I've read/heard about it, it seems to be a book that tend to deeply move many different types of readers, so that one is currently my "bookshelf motivation".
     
  10. jazz from hell

    jazz from hell Ancient Mariner

    I don't understand that word.
     
  11. JudasMyGuide

    JudasMyGuide Domini canis

    My mistake - because of its origins and area of influence, it is quite common here to talk about Calvinism and Helvetic faith interchangeably. The connection seems to be missing in English, or a short Google search would suggest so. So let me rephrase that - "completely Calvinistic". You know, TULIP and all.
     
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  12. Natalie

    Natalie Insect of Terror Staff Member

    I had to read Crime & Punishment for high school English back in the day, and it was actually one of those books where it helped to dig in and analyze. It felt like there was a lot going on psychologically and it helped to get some context. I'd definitely recommend the book.

    War & Peace has been on the reading list for a long time but it's a huge work so I haven't gotten round to it, especially after I read Anna Karenina first (hated it).
    But I did really enjoy The Death of Ivan Ilyich, which I read in college if I recall correctly for a class called Death & Dying (that was pretty awesome). Big plus is that DII is a novella so it's super short.

    On the subject of Russian authors, I'm halfway through The Master & Margerita by Bulgakov. It's going very slowly but I'm enjoying it when I do sit down with it. It's definitely one of those where it takes some time to digest a few sentences, so much weird stuff is going on. Reminds me a bit of One Hundred Years of Solitude in it's 'realistic' surrealism (and weirdness), but I do think it's more accessible than OHYS.
     
  13. Night Prowler

    Night Prowler ɹǝlʍoɹԀ ʇɥƃᴉN Staff Member

    I read Crime & Punishment in school and didn't finish it because the idiot main character annoyed me so much. We didn't have to read War & Peace thankfully since it's way too fucking long. I enjoyed Anna Carenina, but it was due to be analyzed in school at the same time as the release of last Harry Potter book so I never finished it :p
    Master & Margerita is awesome. Definitely the best book I ever read for school.
     
  14. Night Prowler

    Night Prowler ɹǝlʍoɹԀ ʇɥƃᴉN Staff Member

    From Russia? Nah. I'm from Serbia and Serbs love Russia. I think we read Wuthering Heights, but not sure. No Austen or LOTF. We did read Hamlet and Old Man & The Sea, those were solid.
     
  15. Natalie

    Natalie Insect of Terror Staff Member

    Anything specific by Turgenev you'd recommend? Satie sounds pretty good to me. :D
     
  16. JudasMyGuide

    JudasMyGuide Domini canis

    Yeah, Slavs really do tend to stick together. We (Czechia) had tons of Russian literature in school and missed out on many classics - we had Moby Dick and the Brontes, but no LOTF, Scarlet Letter etc.

    Also had no Serbians (apart from our teacher recommending Pavić and his Dictionary of the Khazars outside the curriculum, saying it's a pretty wild-ass book, IIRC), so I should maybe phrase it as Slavs being all over Russia instead.
     
  17. Night Prowler

    Night Prowler ɹǝlʍoɹԀ ʇɥƃᴉN Staff Member

    Yep and yep.

    Khazar Dictionary is friggin insane book. Didn't get too far when I read it for school.
     
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  18. Ariana

    Ariana Purple leopard

    We studied Branislav Nušić's Autobiography in school. I loved it as a kid.
     
  19. Ariana

    Ariana Purple leopard

    Oh, and don't even get me started on Russian literature. We must have studies the whole lot, from start to finish. Fucking Russians, stealing our alphabet and then torturing us with Gogol...
     
  20. JudasMyGuide

    JudasMyGuide Domini canis

    Well, newly recorgnised official short name, yes.
     

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